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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

One of my big concerns in building props is being able to store them for next year. While I have a decent size house - my decorations tend to be big - the bigger the better. This year I am building a new fence and gate and wanted to make some cool pillars. I work in the sign and decor industry and use coroplast a lot and decided to give it a go. It's plastic - lasts forever and light as can be. The trick is - to just score the coroplast to bend it - cutting through only one side and not the other. When Halloween is over, I can remove the tape from one side and store the pillars flat. I used a crate for the base and wrapped it in self adhesive vinyl (car wrap material) that I printed. I used the old spray insulation for the fake coals at the top. I just need to spray paint that and hit the bottom part with a hair dryer to remove any buckling in the vinyl. I'm also going to add an additional layer to almost double the height. I'll be able to secure this to the ground relatively easily. I'm pretty psyched - just need to make the second one this week some time.

-Missy
 

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Okay. This would be hella convenient to design it with a concrete block as a base. Or maybe a bag of sand inside. I can also imagine if you wanted to paint the coroplast, or maybe use the thinnest foam to cut a bunch of bricks or stones then glue them in place.

I need to buy some coroplast!
 

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I'm going with the bag of sand as the base....but the concrete block is a great idea as well. Cutting the coro into bricks is a great idea. If I had more time - I'd use monster mud - the good news is - I can always do that next year using the same pillars. They will look way better once I get rid of the buckle in the adhesive backed vinyl.
 

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Monster mud makes it heavier. Foam is lighter.

You could try the floating floor underlayment foam. You can cut that stuff with scissors. Just start cutting rectangles to make bricks. Get a gallon jug of Elmers Glue, dump some sand in it, and glue the foam to the coroplast. Squeeze-out can be smoothed to look like the mortar between bricks.

I would want to try natural stonework, so I think I'd be using thicker foam like 3/8" or 1/2" thick, and using a heatgun to texture them deeply and rounding the corners over drastically.
 
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