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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been away for a awhile. So, after much laurel resting, I have finally finished building my new fogscreen. Two years in the making and finally done!

This new one is superior to my old fogscreen in almost every respect:
1. Everything is internal; all this requires is mains power, a DMX cable, and a water hose. No more tanks, pipes, or ducts to deal with.
2. Bigger is better (that's what she said); even though the curtain of fog has the same dimensions as the old fogscreen (42" wide, .5" thick at the business end), the entire fogscreen is larger, increasing the total laminar column of air for better stability of the 42" fog curtain. This one is 60" wide and 16.5" deep vs the old one (42"W x 10.5"deep).
3. No babysitting; This one has an auto fill system so I don't have to babysit the water level (ultrasonic foggers have an auto shutoff if the water level gets too low).
4. Programmable; 100% DMX controlled e.g. turning on auto fill, activating fog, air and fog speed, and fog density.
6. Real Honeycomb; No more straws, well, maybe a few for internal delivery of the fog! This is utilizing aircraft grade aluminum honeycomb for the laminar filter which gives WAY better uniformity and uniformity is what laminar is all about!
7. No more lugging iron; The new ultrasonic foggers are not rectified so, DC is supplied via MeanWell PSUs. These are so much lighter than the AC transformers used in my old fogscreen.

Here are the initial Sketchup pics. For the Sketchup pics, the reason there are lots of partitions in the parts is because of the build volume limitations of my 3D printers. A good majority of this thing is 3D printed.

Now for the pics and videos. Also, please excuse the mess. My workshop tends to get like this when I start on a project of this magnitude!

fogscreen.jpg fogscreen01.jpg fogscreen03.jpg fogscreen04.jpg fogscreen06.jpg

Here are some of the "first light" pics. There will be more to follow, along with a ton of build pics and more
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First light video

Fog Density test

Quick video projection test


More to come, I promise!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Let's start with the honeycomb. So, after procuring aluminum honeycomb (not as easy a task as it sounds) It needed to be cut, expanded and trimmed to size. Of course, going into this, I didn't know how to do any of it! Cutting was the most physically demanding part but didn't taking much figuring to do it. Expanding it was a pretty daunting task. After trying to look up the procedure for expanding honeycomb, I became a little despondent. Commercially expanded honeycomb required a special expander to do the job right. I finally had to look up one of these devices to see how they worked. Now, I could have ordered the honeycomb expanded and cut to size but due to the fragility of aluminum honeycomb, the shipping costs (which were already high for the unexpanded) would have been astronomical. It probably would have added another $200~$300 to the shipping. Well, after learning how the honeycomb expanders worked, I figured out how to make my own "expander" :D

So, there it is... 120lbs worth of unexpanded aluminum honeycomb. Solid as a brick!
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After several hours of cutting with a hack saw, I sliced off the piece I needed.
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...And now for the expansion!
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After expanding, cleaving was easy. Just a sharp kitchen knife and some patience
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Stay tuned for more!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
that looks absolutely amazing!
Thank you!

More build pics

Water channel with ultrasonic foggers. The channel is made from .125" aluminum brake that I had custom bent.
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The fog fan and fog outlet channel assembly being printed
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Fitting the fog fan assmblies
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And here I am just turning a cat litter bucket into a fog chiller thinkin' I'm crafty while this guy is going Disney Imagineer over here.

excellent device. Wish I had one. It would solve my problem of not having a good space for projections.
 

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And here I am just turning a cat litter bucket into a fog chiller thinkin' I'm crafty while this guy is going Disney Imagineer over here.
You took the words right out of my mouth (which has been hanging agape since I saw this post.) Just... wow! This is one prop I will NOT be trying to build.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
And here I am just turning a cat litter bucket into a fog chiller thinkin' I'm crafty while this guy is going Disney Imagineer over here.

excellent device. Wish I had one. It would solve my problem of not having a good space for projections.
Hey ,we're all haunters here! I know I am going to sound modest but truly, these aren't too hard to build. Time consuming and tedious, yes but not too difficult. I think the hard part is just procuring the materials. My first fogscreen was made of wood and used drinking straws! http://www.halloweenforum.com/halloween-props/135052-fogscreen-project.html

I had the same problem as you... no where for projections that would work with the rest of my setup. The first time I saw one of these, I knew I had to buy or build one. After nearly passing out at the price of buying one, I set my sights on building one. The cool thing about these is that kids have to walk through it. Some of the kids were hesitant and others were downright scared! I had to coax them through with the promise of extra candy!

This is ridiculously amazing and I freakin KNOW I cannot come up with this on my own!
I think you could. As I had stated above, these are time consuming to build but I think anyone could do it. There really is no secret formula, just a uniform honeycomb and some fans.


Thanks for the praises, everyone! There are some really talented and smart people on this forum so, coming from you guys, it really means a lot!

I am still getting everything put away from this year's haunt. When I get more time, I will finish posting my build process.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sorry it has been so long since I last posted. A job change and a loss in the family turned my life upside down. Things have normalized somewhat and I am back to getting the rest of this project posted!

So, next on the list: Getting the water channel completed.

Printing up the end caps
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End cap with hose fittings and float switch for the auto-fill system
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End caps in place. Now for a water test to make sure there are no leaks as well as checking the autofill cut-off switch to make sure it stops the channel from filling once the water gets to the proper level.
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Running fog, just because! :)
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No leaks. Now that all the fog fan assemblies fit snugly in between the end caps, it's time to get the rest of the assembly together.
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The end plates that pretty much everything will be mounting to. 3/16" thick aluminum. 24"x18".
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Getting the water channel mounted to aluminum angle pieces
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Mounting assembly to the end plates
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Because of the tremendous splash from these ultrasonic foggers, I needed to install some splash guards to keep most of the water in the water channel
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Doing one last check to make sure everything fits
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So those are all the updates I have for this post. There will be more to follow.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Now that is a project!!!!! Amazingly well done. Mesmerizing in use too like watching a campfire only cooler.
Thank you!!

Time to get the fog chamber built. Unfortunately, due to my Halloween deadline last year, I didn't stop to take many pictures but honestly, there isn't too much more than what I am posting. So, this chamber will be carrying the fog from the upper water channel and delivering the fog to the laminar honeycomb. Inside this chamber will be the fog and right outside the chamber will be the air from the main air fans.

Since the main air would be hitting the outside of this chamber, I wasn't sure how that was going to affect the airflow. I didn't want the air from the fans to speed up and slide down the sides of the fog chamber. This would cause the air closest to the center of the fogscreen to move faster than the air at the out edges. Of course, this was only a guess as I know next to nothing about aerodynamics. I felt the best way to combat this was to make the fog chamber out of material that was smooth on the inside but textured on the outside.

I decided on fluorescent diffuser plastic. Unfortunately, it is not the easiest material to work with. Made from acrylic plastic, that stuff breaks and shatters like you wouldn't believe. Even drilling holes took some patience. I think I would have been better off just poking holes with a hot spike, heated with a blow torch. And now for the TL;DR portion of the post... Picutres! Enjoy.

These are the printed pieces that reside at the very bottom of the fog chamber.
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Finding straws for delivery of the fog from the fog chamber to the laminar honeycomb was not easy. The ones at Smart and Final were either too large or too small. The straws I got from multiple grocery stores and other places were the same, too small or too large. While doing some unrelated shopping at a dollar store, I happened upon some straws that looked to be about the perfect size.
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Lo and behold, these straws were the perfect fit and were much cheaper than anything else I had found. Too bad I couldn't get them in black. Oh well, no one would really see them inside anyway.
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So, after much cursing and anger fits of getting this bastard plastic cut and drilled, I got all the components mounted and assembled. Because the plastic was so frustrating to work with, I didn't get any pictures of the preparation or assembly, I just wanted it done!
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After doing a fog test and seeing a ton of condensation pour out the bottom of the assembly, it was clear that I needed a drip channel to catch and drain the condensation out of the fog chamber. Here, you can see the channel that carries the water out.
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The completed fog chamber, mounted to the bottom of the water assembly. Here, you can see the tube that carries the unwanted condensation out of the fog chamber.
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That's all I have for this post. I'll get another post up as soon as I can. Stay tuned!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It was at this point when there was little more I could do with this on the floor. It was time to lift it and start working on the main honeycomb. The best part about honeycomb is its inherent strength "with the grain". This was handy when I needed access to the inside of the whole assembly to finish. That entailed one whole side panel off.

To secure the honeycomb, gravity was going to do most of the work but the honeycomb would be secured at both ends. For the long wood panels that flanked the length of the fogscreen, I attached 1/2"x1/2" aluminum angle the full length. The honeycomb would rest on this since the length was "against the grain" and the honeycomb would sag. At the extreme ends, the honeycomb would also rest on 1"x1" angle but there would be carriage bolts that would pass through the cells to keep the honeycomb stretched and secured.

Do you ever get the feeling that when you explain things, It seems like you're doing a horrible job? That's me right now. I don't feel I am explaining things well. Oh well, here are some pics! Enjoy!

Just having fun with the light properties of the honeycomb
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All of the fog straws laid out. 115 straws, 42" wide
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The honeycomb with fog straws mounted in the fogscreen assembly. Getting closer!!
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The straws were inserted flush to the the bottom of the honeycomb. When everything is ready, they will be slid up into the fog chamber.
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The straws now connecting the honeycomb to the fog chamber.
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Fiberglass A/C filter, cut to size being laid down. The purpose of the A/C filter is to slow down the air and to remove "hot spots" from the fans. The key to laminar flow is to have the air traveling at the same speed and volume throughout the entirety of the honeycomb. Filtering is one of the way to achieve this.
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A little hard to see in this pic but window screen is the last step. The window screen is laid on top of the fiberglass A/C filter and attached at the edges. This provides additional air filter and also hold the A/C filter in place.
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More posts to follow.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Nearing the end. This section shows the work on the fan section. So, because of the custom angles needed for the fan assemblies, this was another part of the fogscreen that I decided to 3d print.

Before I go further, I wanted to talk a little bit about 3D printing. I posted this project on another forum and I was asked, "Why 3D print? It's cheaper and more effective (time wise) to have the parts made to order." While this is true for a large production run e.g. tens, hundreds, thousands, or more parts; it doesn't scale down though. I can't imagine a shop quoting me a good price for only 4 items. Even at 10 items, it seems like it would still cost a bit. Yes, it would have saved time having someone else manufacture parts I suppose than printing out multiple 45 hour printed parts but none of this stuff was tested. I had no idea if any of these parts were going to work. So, to be able to prototype in my own home, at my own pace, it's hard to beat that. Now that I know how this all turned out, if I were to do it all over again, sure, I would send out for a lot of these parts.

So back at it. Again, few pics due to time constraints. The fans I am using are Nidec VA450DC fans. 220cfm which is way overkill but I have plenty of airflow headroom because of it! All total, 24 main fans flank the sides of the fogscreen.

Printing up one of the mounts for 2 fans
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One set done. Checking angles before mounting.
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Getting them lined up
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Mounted. Time to get these wired up. Bonus if you can guess the Marx Brothers movie in the background!
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Wiring along.... Detective Mills is in the background, chasing John Doe (John Doe by choice!)
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Dirty wiring, duct tape, along with a big mess. Yes, this was just to get it up and running to do a "first light" test and see if the damn thing actually worked!
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A closer look at the look at the wiring and the controller which I will go over in my next post.
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Only one or two more posts to go before I have all of my construction pics posted here.
 
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Hi bro, on seeing your work, got impressed and I built this fog screen, from the model before it, but used fog machine, after lot of work, I couldn't get any output, but I won't stop Untill I get the output, can I use 3000 lumen projector, how you gave pressure at the Centre flow of fog from down ground level to the up fog screen,
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Sorry it took so long to get back to you. So, just like the surrounding air in the fogscreen, the fog also needs to be pushed through at a similar speed. Since you're using a fog machine, I don't think the force of the fog machine will be enough to push it through. One of the things you could try is assisting your fog machine with a fan. An easy way to do this would be to take a piece pipe, affix a fan to one end, drill a hole toward the center of the length for the nozzle of the fog machine and then hook a hose to the other end of the pipe that runs to your fogscreen. The fog machine will emit fog into the pipe and the fan will push it through. See attached pic for a rough diagram of what I mean..

View attachment 548946
 
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Thanks for your reply bro, I used a blower to speed up the smoke, but I can't get a laminar flow, tomorrow I'll send you the pictures, bro, and which projector you used, I can't get the picture in my 3000 lumen projector,
 
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First I used 1200 w, fog machine and a chiller, then I fastened up the smoke using blower through one inch pipe with 3mm holes continously in it, and used two exhaust fans for the air flow through the straw, and 3000 lumen short throw projector, I couldn't get the air flow correctly, in next trial I am going to change the model, going to use two blower for the smoke entry and instead of exhaust I am going to try smallDC motors with fans, as your second built method, but your fog flow is very linear, how you gained it, in mine, after 10 cm, both smoke and air are mixing and cannot get that three layer flow
 
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