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Shadow box dancer
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Are you going to be putting the tubing inside the garbage can? I would suggest skipping that step. If you just let the fog linger in the can with the ice, the next puff of fog pushes out pretty much the same amount, leaving fog in the garbage can to chill until the next puff. If you put tubing in there it pretty much just rushes through the tubing and doesn't really get a chance to chill. I just put and inlet tube that went in a few inches and an outlet tube that went in a few inches as well. Good luck on the chiller. They are a fun project to build. So many different ideas you can try.
 

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I agree, no tubing. My trash can chiller allows the fog to enter the can, expand and then contact the ice at which time it exits the can. The tubing does not allow the fog to expand or have as much contact with the ice.
 

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Last year I attempted to build the garbage can ice chiller. Once I found that I did not purchase nearly enough dryer vent tubing (3 feet or so) I ended up just pumping the fog through the tubing.

I ended up taking a ton of duct tape and sealed off one end of the dryer vent, then poked a hole in the centre of it, shoved a paper towel roll in the hole and sealed the other end of the paper towel roll around the output from the fog chiller.

Over all I wasn't too happy with the results. It seemed like it was working ok at first but later on the fog stopped chilling just ended up rising.

This year I'm just going to use a PVC tube full of ice. I don't want to mickey-mouse with the connections to the fog machine this time around.


A question I have for other haunters is why is it important for the fog to expand before contacting the ice?
 

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Shadow box dancer
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I don't know about the science of it, but I do know that if you don't use the tubing and just let the fog go directly in with the ice that you have more capacity for fog, it has more direct contact with the ice and stays in contact with the ice longer. There are lots of ways to build a fog chiller. Even more "opinions" on how to build a fog chiller. Basically what it all boils down to is that most of them "work", its just how much you are willing to spend. I have watched lots of videos of fog chillers in action. From cat liter bins filled with ice to $4000 professional fog chillers and to be honest most of them produce a ground fog. Personally I think the fun part is building one.
 

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Halloween AA Member
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Discussion Starter #6
Yardhauntjunkie & Homestead Haunt - so basically what you are saying is to have part of the dryer vent on one side where the fog machine is and another on the other side. Then fill the garbage can with ice, and that should do the trick? How much ice do you put in? Also should I still be using dryer vent tubing or something else?
 

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Funeral Crasher
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I think the vortex chiller has the fog coming into the garbage can at the top, then the fog exits on the opposite side of the can at the bottom. I don't think you'd want to fill the whole can with ice. There wouldn't be room for the fog to expand. Probably just ice at the bottom with your exit hose just above the ice? I'm guessing here, if I'm wrong let me know.
I was going to make one of these this year with the dryer vent hose, but if you say I don't really need it that's great! I can use that money elsewhere. LOL
 

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Shadow box dancer
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I personally use a cooler with 3 inch pvc on one side and then another short piece on the other side. I put a rolled up piece of chicken wire to connect the two and then filled it 3/4 of the way full with ice.

If I were to do the garbage can idea I would suggest the vortex method of having and inlet(which could be dryer vent that ran from the bottom up though the center of the garbage can and leave about a foot of space at the top. Then put your short outlet tube on the other side on the bottom of the can. then fill it about to the top o the hose leaving space at the top for it to expand or whatever it does up there. To be honest one of the cooler ones(and better working ones) was very similar to this concept. But, it requires a lot of ice.

Another one that seemed to work well was a guy that used a kitty liter bucket filled with ice. 3 inch pipe inlet on one side and another on the other side. Made some pretty good ground fog in my opinion and it was super cheap(something I always like).
 

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13mummy, DaveintheGrave is on the right track. The garbage can is devided into 2 sections (top and bottom) there is a grate going between the 2 sections. The top 1/2 gets filled with ice. A fog machine inlet is plumbed going into the garbage can at the bottom side but a pipe carries the fog to the top of the can where it is released into the can. The fog expands and cools and drops down throught the ice where it exits out a 2nd openning in the bottom side of the can. I can take a picture of mine if you would like and post it.
 

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OK, here we go!
Here is the overall chiller with the fog machine posed at the input.


Looking inside the chiller you can see the support framework made from PVC and the fog input pipe entering at the bottom and comming all the way up to about 2" short of hitting the trashcan lid when its on


I cut 3 pieces of the the metal sheets that cement is put on vertical surfaces with, the name escapes me right now but this is what the ice sits on when in operation.


And the last picture is an overall showing the for machine and the input and you can see the output on the other side. Also notice the weather stripping around the lid for a tight seal.
 

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The fog entering the chamber and expanding forces the fog out the bottom after it passes through the ice. One of the main problems with chillers that only use PVC tubes filled with ice or smaller chillers is that the fog does not have a chance to fully expand. When I first saw this design I could not see how the fog would get out on its own but it really works well.
 

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I was at the point on giving up on chilled fog. I had built one of the ice chest chillers and I was never very happy with the fog it produced. On top of that it took about $30 worth of ice to fill it. I then won a Mini Vortex chiller in a contest and tried it out last year. It's the one that seems to be made out of a kitty litter container. First off it only took maybe 2 bags of ice and they lasted all night - I had extra on hand but never needed them. As for the fog, considering I'm in Canada where it's normally much cooler in October, I was very impressed with the fog produced. It hugged the ground and took a while to dissipate. I was also using Froggy's swamp juice which helped.
 

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The addition of a 'Y' fitting on the output tube with a computer cooling fan "blowing" in from the angled side will generate a small negative pressure flow inside the chiller. Effectively pulling the fog through it.
You do NOT want to have your fog go through the fan itself, it will deatomize some of the fog and turn it back into a liquid. (and liquids and electric fans are NOT friends)
These fittings can be found by searching your home improvement website for "wye" and don't think you can get away with just using a "T" fitting...because it will not give you the directional flow you are looking for.
Also, I would suggest using a variable voltage regulator to adjust the fan speed to dial in the amount of pressure you need. Just remember, that you may need to adjust it throughout your event do to the changing conditions that effect fog...Temp/humidity being the biggest two.

PS: Don't forget to add a drain. Try to add the one you can attach a hose to, so you can put the waste water where you want it and not around your fogger.
 

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Mill Creek Haunted Hollow
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THANK YOU Homestead Haunt!!!

I had also given up on fog chillers through several seasons of failed experiments. This looks great, and I really appreciate you explaining some of the physics behind the chiller's operation.

I will definitely try this out! :D
 
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