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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i have my first fog machine, the 400 watt 1byone on Amazon. I tried using an ice chest and around a 4 foot hose, probably a small vacuum cleaner hose going through it full. I put a good amount of ice in the foam ice chest and turned the machine on. I was definitely underwhelmed. The fog was really not coming out of the chest very fast, and would not get 2 feet away before it was gone. I eventually took the house off and the fog machine is putting out, the fog goes straight out and was a decent output. I just really want to cover maybe 30-50 feet of my front yard, did I underbuy here? I am thinking maybe the fog is not coming out very well through the hose because of back pressure maybe? I need to know something pretty quick so I can just buy another one if needed. Thanks!
 

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1) Try a better fog juice - Froggy's Fog is one that gets a lot of recommendations. You might want to run the machine for a bit longer as well, it sometimes takes mine 30 minutes to get to peak output.
2) A 400W is a bit small for the area you're discussing if 30-50 ft is the width. If you want 30-50 square feet you should be fine. A good chiller will help cover a larger area - I recommend something like this http://www.halloweenforum.com/tutor...815-build-your-own-vortex-fusion-chiller.html

I have 2 400W foggers and they both work pretty well but there's a clear difference between them and my almost as cheap 1000W
 

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checked a few sites and this is what I came up with.
◾400 Watt - Creates about 1500 cubic feet of fog each minute. This machine is perfect for home use when you want to add fog to just one room.

◾700 Watt - This fog machine pumps out about 3500 cubic feet of fog every minute and may be the perfect choice for your yard or larger spaces.

◾1000 Watt - The largest size of fog machine available, this machine cranks out about 4500 cubic feet of fog per minute. This machine should be your choice for very large venues or spacious areas that need fogging.

Based on the 30x50 area sounds like the 400 watt would work but being out side and with wind a factor you might need to up size or use 2 of the size you have.

Here is a site with more detailed info.
http://www.halloweenexpress.com/all-about-fog-machines.php
 

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Is your hose going through the the ice chest? Are you allowing the fog to get chilled? If your vacuum cleaner hose runs through the entire ice chest and out the other side, your fog is probably not getting cold enough. You need to allow the fog to actually come in contact with the cold to make it more dense. I would suggest putting some type of metal grates or small mesh chicken wire inside the ice chest to create a cavity on the bottom of the cooler. Make sure your inlet and outlet holes are in the lower cavity that you created. Then cover the mesh with ice. Don't run your vacuum tube entirely through the ice chest. Only use the tube to carry the fog to the ice chest inlet hole and then again from the outlet hole to where you want the fog to appear. You want to eliminate the hose inside the cooler. Another way to solve the problem would be to make a tunnel out of the square mesh chicken wire and place the tunnel between the inlet and outlet holes inside the ice chest. Then fill the cooler with ice or cover the mesh with ice and let the fog come into contact with the ice before it exits the cooler. If you are just covering a plastic tube with ice inside a cooler, it will not chill the fog. Basically you just want to create a void inside the cooler to allow the fog to pass through freely while still allowing the fog to come into contact with the ice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is your hose going through the the ice chest? Are you allowing the fog to get chilled? If your vacuum cleaner hose runs through the entire ice chest and out the other side, your fog is probably not getting cold enough. You need to allow the fog to actually come in contact with the cold to make it more dense. I would suggest putting some type of metal grates or small mesh chicken wire inside the ice chest to create a cavity on the bottom of the cooler. Make sure your inlet and outlet holes are in the lower cavity that you created. Then cover the mesh with ice. Don't run your vacuum tube entirely through the ice chest. Only use the tube to carry the fog to the ice chest inlet hole and then again from the outlet hole to where you want the fog to appear. You want to eliminate the hose inside the cooler. Another way to solve the problem would be to make a tunnel out of the square mesh chicken wire and place the tunnel between the inlet and outlet holes inside the ice chest. Then fill the cooler with ice or cover the mesh with ice and let the fog come into contact with the ice before it exits the cooler. If you are just covering a plastic tube with ice inside a cooler, it will not chill the fog. Basically you just want to create a void inside the cooler to allow the fog to pass through freely while still allowing the fog to come into contact with the ice.
The tube was running straight though. I saw a few links on the web where people had done something like that.

I just ordered the 1000 watt fog machine from Amazon. Should I just redo this ice-chest or build the chiller out of a cat litter container I see so many threads about? I can do either, not sure what will actually work better. The chest is pretty big, probably a 48 quart, very thick foam.
 

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I use 400 watt fog machines all the time. They can put out sufficient fog. But there are other factors to consider such as weather conditions. If it's a really windy day your fog will dissipate quickly no matter what size foggier you use. I have had 1000 watt fog machines and 400 watt fog machines. I personally prefer the 400 watt fog machines based simply on price. I have gone through many different types of fog machines and I have come to the conclusion that most of them are disposable. My 1000 watt only lasted a few seasons before biting it. I have had 400 watt fog machines bite it as well. I have tried everything from cleaning them to storing fog juice in them to try and lengthen the life of my fog machines. I personally don't think the cost difference is worth it to purchase the 1000 watt fog machine. I simply use several 400 watt fog machines at the same time to get the desired fog. I usually go to target the day after Halloween and buy several 400 watt fog machines when they are 50% off. I keep a couple in storage in case one of my fog machines die. This is just my personal opinion. There really isn't a wrong fog machine. It all depends on what your willing to spend.
 

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The tube was running straight though. I saw a few links on the web where people had done something like that.

I just ordered the 1000 watt fog machine from Amazon. Should I just redo this ice-chest or build the chiller out of a cat litter container I see so many threads about? I can do either, not sure what will actually work better. The chest is pretty big, probably a 48 quart, very thick foam.
I would do both. I would redo your current chiller and if that didn't work I would try the cat litter container. I don't think you are allowing your fog to get cold enough. I have experimented with different fog chiller set ups and I think the cat litter one looks pretty good. I can post some picks of a chiller I have used for several years with a 400 watt fog machine that works well for me. I won't be able to post pics until tomorrow. I'm currently at work and can't snap any pics until I get home.
 

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Just in case you hadn't already done this; make certain there's a inch or two air gap between the output nozzle on the fog machine and the hose you're pumping into - otherwise, there seems to be difficulty in the fog forming properly and moving through the tube. I don't know if it's backpressure or if the fog just condenses on the inside of the pipe after it's generated, but the air gap helps considerably.

Also, you may want to consider a larger hose diameter than a vacuum hose - I've always used larger, and even with smaller machines like the 400 watt, have had decent amounts of fog make it through.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just in case you hadn't already done this; make certain there's a inch or two air gap between the output nozzle on the fog machine and the hose you're pumping into - otherwise, there seems to be difficulty in the fog forming properly and moving through the tube. I don't know if it's backpressure or if the fog just condenses on the inside of the pipe after it's generated, but the air gap helps considerably.

Also, you may want to consider a larger hose diameter than a vacuum hose - I've always used larger, and even with smaller machines like the 400 watt, have had decent amounts of fog make it through.
Yeah I read that after I had done my test. The hose was very tight on the fog machine, probably most of the problem. I am going to go ahead and redo the entire design though, much like what everyone says. Going to a normal Home Depot or Lowes, what do I look for in some type of mesh?
 

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Here's the pipe I use, except what I've found at Home Depot was not perforated:
4 inch drain pipe
There are fittings for it, it cuts easily with a utility knife, is plenty large and fog moves through it like a charm.
There's even room inside for frozen water bottles or ice, if you want to try that idea as a linear fog chiller (I didn't have a lot of luck with the smaller fog machine, as blocking the pipe seemed to slow the flow of fog....but with my larger fogger, it works pretty well).

As for a mesh I use in my box fog chiller? I like to use the hardware cloth galvanized mesh:
1/4 inch hardware cloth
They sell 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch - I like the smaller mesh, as it won't let the ice slip through until the bits are rather small...and I've had good luck with the fog being able to move through for the most part (even when the bits are small, they're not fusing into a single lump, blocking the fog - they still allow air to pass through)

Not sure what sort of fog chilling design you're going to use, but I've gone for the "vortex" style, where my fog pumps into the 4" pipe that runs into the chiller - the pipe enters very low, runs to the center of the chiller, makes a 90 degree bend straight up, and runs to the top of the chiller (actually, it opens up about 2-3 inches from the lid). I like this style, as it forces the fog to move through the coldest parts of the chiller before it leaves, so I'm getting that fog as cold as I can. I've made my mesh platform about 4 inches from the floor of the chiller, and I just throw ice in, nice and loose. Melt water drains out through the pipe and fog outlets, and some cracks and crevices around the chiller (I've custom made mine out of 1 inch foam insulation - it's about 24 inches x 30 inches x 16 inches on the interior dimensions)
 

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Yeah I read that after I had done my test. The hose was very tight on the fog machine, probably most of the problem. I am going to go ahead and redo the entire design though, much like what everyone says. Going to a normal Home Depot or Lowes, what do I look for in some type of mesh?
Go to the garden section outside. They have chicken wire. There are different shapes available. I would opt for the smallest square wire. It is usually located in the back past all the plants. It is actually called blue hawk brand galvanized steel hardware cloth. It comes in 24 inch by 10 foot rolls. I think it cost about $12 a roll. Just ask a store employee where the chicken wire is located and it should be located in the same area. I would get the smallest squares so that it will keep the ice from falling through as it melts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Go to the garden section outside. They have chicken wire. There are different shapes available. I would opt for the smallest square wire. It is usually located in the back past all the plants. It is actually called blue hawk brand galvanized steel hardware cloth. It comes in 24 inch by 10 foot rolls. I think it cost about $12 a roll. Just ask a store employee where the chicken wire is located and it should be located in the same area. I would get the smallest squares so that it will keep the ice from falling through as it melts.
And the rest will end up in the garbage. Any thoughts on a cheap ice chest.
 

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Here is a pic of one of the mesh tubes I tried to explain in a previous post. I set this between the inlet an outlet and cover it with ice. The last pic is of one of my other chillers I use. In the last pick I used a flexible metal dryer tube. The metal tube gets covered with ice and the chilled tube condenses the fog. It is a big enough tube that I even throw some ice inside the tube for good measure.

Green Net Glass

Green Grass Net Glass

 

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Here's a pic of the interior of my chiller with vinyl gutter guard compared to the hardware cloth - I just added it this year, and am not certain how well it's going to work.
I'm hoping it will hold the weight of ice, as it's kind of flimsy (but it won't rust).



What you can see in this pic, however, is the "vortex" design of the pipe running up, and putting the fog in the chiller, forcing it down and through the ice before seeping out the bottom (exit holes are on the other side of the inlet pipe on the bottom).
 

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