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Wisp in the Mist
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Discussion Starter #1
I don't know if this should go here, or just in General, so sorry if I put it in the wrong place! :)

I've been eyeing Dremels lately, and wondered if I need all of the fancy little attachments that come with the more expensive models? For making tombstones, do you really use a lot of different tips, or specific tips that are only available with the more expensive model?

Also, I know that the more expensive ones have higher motor speed. Do I need that, or is the basic one good enough for occasionally making tombstones? I don't plan on making very many at a time; maybe 3 with a bit of scroll work and rather short inscriptions.

Thanks!
 

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Don't know where the Revenant's Lair is, but if it's near some pawn shops you might want to check them for Dremels before buying a new one. I've bought two of them, with all the attachments, for $25. :)

As for the attachments, one thing I've learned with Dremels is once you have one, what you initially needed one for quickly becomes irrelevant as you'll soon find dozens of uses for it. I've used mine for drilling, cutting, shaving, sanding, polishing, engraving, and grinding. The accessory I use the most are the 1/8" Rotosaw bits they sell at most home stores. These cut through anything, and you just insert them into the material like a drill bit, then start moving left and right to cut. Great tool! I've stopped using the little sanding sleeve attachments as the quickly get clogged up and need to be replaced.
 

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Lighthearted Halloween
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I'm tagging along on this thread to see any tips or tricks. :)
I just got my first Dremel as a Mother's Day present and it's still in the package, because I am not sure where to get started! LOL
Last night my husband caught me putting a channel in some foamboard using a grapefruit spoon, and the Dremel box was sitting right there on the counter. hahaha
 

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7,208 Posts
I very ignorantly burnt-up a few Dremels over-working them. Then I bought a series of larger grinders until I finally got the one I like. A Black & Decker 3.5 inch without a clumbsy safety switch, usually around $40, ergo-namically correct for me too.
I also discovered along the way the .045 inch thickness cutting wheels made by DeWalt. You can cut all thicknesses of steel very quickly. I used to spend hours holding the grinder waiting for a 1/4 inch thick wheel to cut that 1/4 path!
I recommend to never use the Dremel wire wheel UNLESS you have a full-face shields AND leather gloves because those little wires come out of that rotating wheel and become poison darts sticking you any old place they want to!
 

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Keeper of Spider Hill
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1,740 Posts
2 small things to add.. 1 I'd buy one with the variable speed adjustment. They are a little more but a lot of times it is nice to get just the right speed for the material or attachment you are using and the fixed speeds never seem to do that for me. Secondly, if you buy a "kit" with multiple attachments it is usually much cheaper than buying any of that stuff individually. Start watching Depot and Lowes. Father's Day is right around the corner and these nice kits will be coming up on sale. They are usually your best value. :)
 

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Lighthearted Halloween
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2 small things to add.. 1 I'd buy one with the variable speed adjustment. They are a little more but a lot of times it is nice to get just the right speed for the material or attachment you are using and the fixed speeds never seem to do that for me. Secondly, if you buy a "kit" with multiple attachments it is usually much cheaper than buying any of that stuff individually.
Thank you! I wasn't sure if I made the right decision in getting the kit. I am happy to read your recommendation.

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Keeper of Spider Hill
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You're welcome. That's a nice kit and it looks like they have a tool-less quick bit change on them now? Have you tried it out yet? I think that would be a nice feature. I have not seen that before.



Thank you! I wasn't sure if I made the right decision in getting the kit. I am happy to read your recommendation.

View attachment 199162
 

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Very good suggestions.
My biggest mistake when purchasing my last dremel was that it was (apparently) an older model (model # = "cheap") and was incompatible with the router attachment. The body style was all wrong...
 

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Human Candy Shovel
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The oddest dremel attachment I have is a dremel work station (kind of looks like a drill press stand for a dremel), which I picked up at a yard sale for $5. It makes an awesome third hand to hold the dremel while you manipulate whatever you're deburring/buffing/sanding/polishing/grinding and it actually also works as a drill press.
 

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BAD INFLUENCE
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As someone else mentioned get the kit for attachments and I have found that the best attachment for my use was the flexoble shaft. i've used that more than anything else.....
 

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The flexible shaft is a MUST! My hand used to get so tired holding my Dremel. It's not that heavy when you start, but the muscle it takes to control it for fine details makes it weight a ton after a while. The shaft also vibrates much less than the Dremel itself. I used to come in from the garage with numb hands :)
I also second the router bits as being very useful but I did a ton with my Dremel before I got them.
 

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bone collector
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Following along with this thread...great suggestions everybody! I am also interested in buying a Dremel AND a hot wire foam cutter. Mostly I would like to use these for tombstone carving (still doing it old school with exacto blades~ugh!).
Suggestions for the best attachments, for both tools, to do the fine detail work on the stones?
 

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Has anybody tried a pantograph attachment with a router for engraving tombstones?? I used to have one for my router and it was perfect for wood signs but I never tried it on foam!! I have been thinking about picking up another one and trying it!!
 

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While the OP looks to have purchased her unit my recommendation is to buy the most power you can afford. Yes, they are more $$ at first but if you do any larger jobs the smaller wattage units will burn up. Pay once cry once. Now, if ALL you are going to do is foam, cheep is ok, but be warned once you get one you will use it for more than just foam.

FYI on the router base get the plunge router system as it allows much better control than the smaller attachment.
 
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