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I've never been a big fan of inflatables and for years refused to use them. But, I got one a couple years ago and worked it into my setup and I like it. I've always had a desire to do a full walk around the backyard haunt and now it occurs to me that I can easily accomplish this with inflatables, creating quite a wonderland for the youngsters that quite frankly are freaked out by most of my front yard display.

However, considering the number of them I could approach for such a thing and all those fans going, can anyone give advise on their experience with a lot of them and how to handle powering them all? Did you run into any breakers popping at a certain amount? My approach to my display thus far is of course using low wattage everything that I can, and also spreading out the power draw by running main extension cords from different breaker zones from the house, so no one breaker gets over taxed. Fog machine power draw can dictate some of that approach.

So long and short, do inflatable fans cause power issues when you use a lot of them?

Thanks!
 

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Ghouls Rule
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Yes, i ran tests on my display separately vs with inflatables. Once i set them all on yeai blew breaker 3 times with people inside. So def test with everything. I thought it was separate lines. I had very large inflatables too, an entrance and at least 4 others outside
 

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we have 167 inflatables running off 10 breakers that are on its own breaker panel. we try to limit it to 15 inflatables per breaker. the only exception is we have 46, 3ft ones that are in a row right in front and those are 23 per breaker. this is our first year with the separate panel and nothing has tripped
 

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I run 22 inflatables about half on one outlet and the other half on another. I never ran in to any problems I do spread it out obviously and the majority are small 3 feet tall minion inflatables so they barely draw any power.
 

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Thanks for the info, all. I know I'd be using around 4 arches and anything between mid to large size. Maybe small ones too. I guess I'll have to be very careful to spread out the power. I've heard it's a lot of expense in electricity too but that's the Christmas crowd, where they have them going for weeks. I'm talking one night for a few hours. Shouldn't be a concern. But power distribution certainly is, if you use the big ones too.
 

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Ghouls Rule
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Yes, def have to feel them out based on sz. Mine are usually huuuuge but one year for xmas I managed mid sized eith at least 12 on one breaker. It really depends on sz tho. Best to play with it and try diff lines if u blow one
 

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Thanks for the info, all. I know I'd be using around 4 arches and anything between mid to large size. Maybe small ones too. I guess I'll have to be very careful to spread out the power. I've heard it's a lot of expense in electricity too but that's the Christmas crowd, where they have them going for weeks. I'm talking one night for a few hours. Shouldn't be a concern. But power distribution certainly is, if you use the big ones too.
yeah I don’t know my family hates the electricity bill but last year for example when I had all my decorations up huge inflatables for example a 13 foot stay puft up and bunch of other stuff from September 21 to November 1 at least 5 hours a day I used less electricity lol Than August.
 

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I do calculations for my lighting/fog.
It's pretty easy.
You just add up the wattages listed on the packaging. A 15 Amp circuit breaker can handle 1800 Watts (120 Volts X 15 Amps). 15 Amps is typical, they are labeled in your panel. Thus, a 20 Amp circuit breaker can handle 2400 Watts (20 X 120).

If you do this, you can separate your props into groups going to different breakers/outlets (multiple outlets are on the same breaker). Always leave a little wiggle room though, like 10 Watts.

As for fog machines, I think there are basically 3 common ones: 400 Watt, 700 Watt, 1200 Watt.
 

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The Haunting Girl
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I do calculations for my lighting/fog.
It's pretty easy.
You just add up the wattages listed on the packaging. A 15 Amp circuit breaker can handle 1800 Watts (120 Volts X 15 Amps). 15 Amps is typical, they are labeled in your panel. Thus, a 20 Amp circuit breaker can handle 2400 Watts (20 X 120).

If you do this, you can separate your props into groups going to different breakers/outlets (multiple outlets are on the same breaker). Always leave a little wiggle room though, like 10 Watts.

As for fog machines, I think there are basically 3 common ones: 400 Watt, 700 Watt, 1200 Watt.
THIS.

I haven't reached the point of doing math, but I always leave lots of wiggle room since I only have a handful of things that need power. Also, all of my breakers have other things running on them since I have no dedicated outdoor outlets. My landlords on the first floor are very kind and share their outlets so I can power everything Halloween night. I'll probably start a spreadsheet at some point so I avoid tripping breakers as my display grows.
 

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Do the math calculations as suggested above. But more importantly get a Kill A Watt meter to measure the actual draw, like this: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16882715001&nm_mc=KNC-MSNSearch-PC&cm_mmc=KNC-MSNSearch-PC-_-pla-_-Surge+Protectors-_-P3+International-_-82715001&msclkid=150e1ae4d54b1bc69ce0413474cc0fc6&gclid=CNGD56XDn94CFdrgswodswIM4A&gclsrc=ds

Since you're connecting the display pieces to existing circuits, you won't know what else is running on that circuit; so be careful loading the circuits, even when you spread them out.

Also, never exceed 80% of the capacity of a breaker. Example, for a 20 amp breaker, don't exceed 16 amps on that circuit. That allows for spikes that occur when an item is first turned on.
 
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