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Discussion Starter #1
Whew, well, first things first. I am a recent member of this wonderful forum, and as such, i have been in awe since the beginning by the enginuity of all it's members. Naturally, after seeing eveything I decided to throw my own hat into the ring. Being my first ever thread on this site, it probably is going to be filled with errors and such, so please, go easy on me.

Anyhoo, i guess you are wondering how this giant animated spider project got it's name, and while i cant say i am a redneck, you probably will be thinking that at the end of this explaination. I DO live on a farm, and so i have quite a few unusual things at my disposal, and i also have a VERY limited budget, so i take what i can get and use it to make the best of everything i make. Additionally, this project is made of the following materials (here come the redneck jokes :rolleyes:)

1 Large Sheet of Ply-wood (or particle board, i used ply-wood but i suspect either would work)

7 (or 8) Pool noodles of equal or similar length and width

1 medium sized piece of 2X2 wooden stock

7 (or eight) Magic Scarves (black preferably, but it is up to you what color you want your spider to be) These scarves were at my local dollar store, and they are the ones that have a very hairy look and can stretch in length and slide over things (for example, you can put your hand inside and it will fit like a sleeve.)

Several yards of black, shag-carpet like material (it almost is like very thick, furry apolstery, but anything you can find similar would be ok as well, it is only for the body)

Hot Wheels(TM) Fireball Track (only found this in my garage, no one bought it at the garage sale, and didnt work anymore, used to fill out the spider's form, foam or anything else would work just as fine.)

1 round styrofoam ball

Toy dump truck bucket ( again, anything similar woudl also serve the same purpose)

Staple gun with staples

1 holiday animated deer motor

1 paint stirrer (i hope i spelled that right)

A ball of twine (heavy string would work)

2 door hinges

A carving knife (I used my pocket knife, but anything sharp should do it)

Packaging tape (or duct tape, but really anything that is heavy duty and sticks)

Needle and thread

And finally, LOTS AND LOTS OF SCREWS (drill is implied)

Aditional things that may be desired include: a table saw, drill press, and jig saw, but they are only for those who dont want to drive themselves insane.
 

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Ok, first you want to get the legs started, so get one of your full pool noodles, and use your knife to cut a knotch into it right about at the middle, or just above the center of it. The cut should be in a wedge shape,and it should go just about half way through it. I will try to attach some pictures of what i did.
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This little wedge cut is so that the leggs can bend without looking all loopy and curved, as see in the two pictures below, the first one shows a cut leg, and the second shows a leg that was just bent.
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After this is done, use the packaging tape to tape the leg up, so it stays bent. My only sugestion is that you tape it over several times to ensure that it stays, but the packaging tape seemed to hold up well overall in keeping it all together.
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Finally, you will need to bulk up the joints in some way, i used plastic bags that had been wraped aroung the joints, and then i secured them with packaging tape. (I am sorry that the noodles keep changing color, but the end of sumemr bargain sale only had these few left, so i took what i could get! Told you i was using anything i could get my hands on :D) The Pics will be in my next post, which sould be up soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hey, sorry about how gigantic the pics were, i didnt realize they would upload so big, but anyhow, here are the pics of the joint bulking:
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It also might be worth mentioning that if your legs are very bright colors (like oragne, blue, or green) you may want to spray them a little with some black spray paint, although that was probbly just me being nit-picky about the whole thing
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After you have done this to all but one leg, you will porbably want to take a break. Understandable, except probably the most grueling task still lies ahead for you, the leg coverings and front legs, muhahahaah:D!! Get the last leg you have, and cut it into two halves (the first picture is of the shortened noodle, though it was probably unnescessary (sorry about spelling too, i am not a human spell check:eek:) Take the knife and strip one end down to a point, sort of like sharpening a sick for marshmallows or a spear.
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Finally, you will want to do the same cut as you have been doing so far, only make this one slightly less sever, so that it offers a more extended look. Remember, no joint bulk for the front ones! Repeat for both halves of the noodle.
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So, that's it for now, but i hope to get the remaining steps for the legs up by tonight, until then, i need to help reshingle the barn, and please, dont be afraid to tell me how i am doing (thread wise, that is) i would appretiate the input for my next posted project.:D
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ok, so i am back, and i think it is time now that i tell about the, eek, leg- warmers! Well, so maybe they arent exactly "leg warmers", but still, you will need to get out your scarves.
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Like i mentioned before, they do not have to be anything special, or even a specific color, just as long as YOU are happy with the results. I had been toying around with the idea of a brown spider, but it was nearing the big day, and so i just stuck with the black. But anyways, you will need to take the scarf, and pull it over top of any one of the legs (except for the small ones, i will adress why in a few seconds). Once you have done this, pull it tight over the leg and notice that it is slightly longer than the overall leg itself. Now here is where any slight deviatioins may occur for you. Some of us may have the same type of scarf, others may not, and the lengths of each type may be different. I am just putting this warning out to all, so be cautious. Mine ended up with just about 4 or so inches extra, just about perfect for the next step. *WARNING: STUPIDITY IN HINDSIGHT ALERT* This is where i realized a very unnescessary step in this whole project, and that was sewing the end of the overhanging end of the scarf shut. This was just something extra i did to help with the overall strength, not something that may have necessarilly been needed. It is up to you if you want to risk innocent fingertips for your spider, although it makes a cool story if you can say you literally put your blood into the project. *END OF UNRELATED STORY* After you do (or do not) sew the end of the scarf that is overhanging the edge of the leg, you will want to twist it up and tape it to form a pointed tip almost for the scarf.
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Now may be as good a time as ever to say that this next step in the process will be a lot easier if your have the pool noodles that have a hole running through the center. If not, well, my only advice to you if you do not have the hollow ones is that you use your knife to carve out the end, or you use a type of nail to secure the ends of the leg to the scarf. For those of you that do have the sunday noodles ( i call them sunday noodles because they are so holy:rolleyes:) the next step would be to insert the pointed tip you have formed into the end of the leg that will be touching the ground.
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Dont be afraid to wedge it in there really tight, the more secure it is, the tighter the covering may be stretched onit, and the less baggy your spider's legs will be. After you get it nice and secured in the end, you will want to flip it inside out, so it goes back over the leg, and reverses itself, leaving the end inserted into the end of the leg, and pulling the slack towards the top. When it is all done, it will look something like this
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So, repeat this for the remaining legs, and on my next post i will show you how to finish the front legs, and then i will get into how i made the body. Have to go to religion right now, so i may get the next one up tommorow, or maybe tonight. Until then, happy haunting!:D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey, so i got back on, and i am now right in the middle of putting the covers on the two front legs, right?, ok, so you have put all but one of the scarfs (if you only bought seven) on the legs right, so you are left with two half sized, pointed legs and one full sized scarf. I think you can probably guess what is coming next. If you said cut the long scarf in half, you would be correct! Please stay on the line to collect your prize! Obvious steps aside, you WILL need to sew this one shut, sorry for those not nimble with a thimble:(. Hey, i am a guy too, so give me some credit for even knowing what a thimble is! The only reason that it is necessary to sew this one is that by cutting it, you have compromized the very strutcure of the scarf, seeing that it is only a complicated sewing pattern that gives it it's stretchyness. After you are done having your fingers become human pin-cushons (again, cant remember the correct spelling:confused:) these legs will be like all of the others, just wrap and insert, flip and oogle:p.
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And, thus completes the legs, but now for the real challenge, the body. You will want to start with a fairly large sheet of cardboard, or another inexpensive material, and sketch out just how big you would like your spider to be. I made mine just like a wakeboard, same in size and shape, and the head should be proportional to the body. Then trace the outline onto the wood, and use the jig-saw to cut it out. Repeat for the head.
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After you get the first copy of the body cut out, you will need to take the piece and put it over another piece of ply-wood, the same size as the original one, and trace the outline of your body onto the sheet. cut this one out, and you should be left with one head board (ha ha, no pun intended) and two identical body pieces. I will end here for now, but i am going to try and get the rest posted tommorow. I am sending in pictures of the display to a local news station, and i really hope they put it on in their Halloween Home segment, because all they have been playing sdo far are crappy store bought blow-ups and pumpkins with corn stalks and haybales. Wish me luck:D!
 

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Thanks Mr. H, i am just glad to be helping some others out with this tutorial! When we left off we were just at the part where you cut out spacers for the body, so grab your 2x2 stock,a nd fighure out how tall you want your body to be. I recomend something within the 10" to 11" range, but the main thing is that you pick a height that will be tall enough to accomadate your motor (mounted about 2" from the base, i will explain shortly), and about three inches for the strings to move around in. Once you have your height marked off, go ahead and cut 'er up using the table saw (or anything else to cut with, doesnt matter), making three identical spacers.

Now, you may be chomping at the bit to mount this sucker and get it over with, but hold on. This sort of thing can cause significant trouble down the road, as i learned when i didnt measure out how long my swing arm and servo arm measured together, and when i didnt mount the motor before screwing the body together with Hot Wheels track attached. Take it from me and do this before hand. Take your motor and place it in the exact spot you will be mounting it in, almost dead center of the spider. Take your paint stirrer and put it onto the motor just as it will end up when it is finally mounted. Figure out just how long you want your motor arm to be overall (mine was something like 7", 8", nothing more than 9" though) and cut it off so the servo and the arm will measure to this distance. Add one to two inches to this to give yourself some clearance, and take the string you have handy (i mentioned that, right?) and cut a length of it so it is as long as the arm plus clearance. Using the string and a pencil, inscribe a circle around the center of the servo's mounting area to map out your positioning for your spacers. Now, using a couple of screws, secure the cut paint stirrer to the motor so that it will not fail in any direction. Use a drill to make a hole near the tip of the arm just big enough to snmugly fit a nail through, and push a nail tightly into the hole, with an equal amount of it exposed on both the top and the bottom of the stirrer. Using the string, (loosely) tie two loops of string onto the nail so that they will not come off, but can rotate freely aroung the nail without snagging. EAch piece should be about four feet in length to be safe, and should have the free ends dangling out of the way but still accessible on the body (in other words, just make sure you can get to them for later). Now, using some spare wooden block, cut out a square of wood to mount the servo motor just high enough off the ground so the cord doesnt interfere with it. Screw it into place in the cneter of the base body, nailing it through the small screw ports on all sides of the motor. If you are lost at this point, PLEASE look at the pictures, especially the first one, they really do help a great deal. Here are the pics of the motor as it should be mounted when everything is said and done, however since i had a brain fart, these next few picture are out of sequence. Because i didnt think, the tutorial goes in a different (though much more efficient) way than i actually built it in the first time, so please bear with me if parts appear and disappear in the pictures, though none of the content should be changed. THe first picture is of the mounted motor, and the second one shows the reason it had to be mounted off the ground somewhat (see the cord is too long).P.S. It is not just duct tape holding the paint stirrer onto the morot, so dont just expect that to be an easy step, pleace use screws and nails.
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After you have done this, it is pretty much smooth sailing, as long as you are conscious of the circle you drew earlier (remember, spacers on the edge of the circle, not in it!). Staggering the two halves creates a more rounded look in the front, though it is not required, i did though. Then just screw it on up, and my goodness, you have a finished body! sortof.......
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So, going down the list so far, we have all the legs made and covered, a head outline, and a 3-d, motor mounted body! Whew, well things are finally starting to shape up, and speaking of shaping up, i will try to have the next step posted tommorw night, bulking up the body and head. Until then, i am watching Heroes. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hey, i am really sorry that i havent been on to post anything lately, but i have been pretty busy. All last week i was preparing for the "big day", putting my costume together, keeping the display maintained, and what not. Then i was away on saturday for a national invitational horse show jumping competition with my girlfriend,a nd finally i was away at a lacrosse tounement in Rochester all day sunday, so needless to say i have been pretty busy. But, reguardless, i realize i havent even shown you a picture of what this spider will look like when it is finished, so here it is. Some were taken at night, but mostly durring the day, but enjoy! I will have the next step up tommorow.

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Thanks for sticking with me Mr. Halloween! I will post the pictures of the spider in full "night light" after the steps are completed. Happy belated Halloween!
 

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you know I saw this thing in real life and it wasn't all it was cracked up. I think you should revise it for next year cause it was really awful and it looked totally fake. I was so dissapointed. Even the movements of the legs were terrible. Ha, well I guess YOU know what I mean. And oh boy am I afraid now. but hopefully this lame, COMPLETELY UNTRUE, FAKE and fajesus ( oh god, ...inside jokes here!...I need a glass of water) post won't ruin my chances of seeing the age of 16 too much. Crazy amazing spider by the way, very ingenious
 

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If you havent guessed, that last post was made by a friend, and of course none of it was true (at least i hope not), but we do have a yearly Halloween party, and this year i gave the guests a guided tour through the display, so they all got to see eveything up close. I had a young cousin (about 3, going on 4) who gets pretty easily scared, and so when she saw the spider (even though it was my first attempt at it, and i wasnt making purposefully THAT scary) was terrified by it. I had to spend the next five minutes trying to comfort her (poor girl, i never meant to scare her:() and in the process i had to find ways to make the spider seem badly constructed, fuzzy rather than intimidating, and completely not real (all of which were suprizingly easy to do, imagine that:rolleyes:). Switchyfeet24, as i will refer to my friend, was at the party and has since not let me forget about the "big teddy bear spider with scarfs for feet and a really twitchy leg" ever since, but it is all in fun.

Anyways, for the next step, we need to bulk this baby up. Now, i had brainstormed many different ways to do this, and most of them were better than the idea i used ultimately, but due to time, money, and just about everything else constraints, i had to resort to using the curved track pieces from the Hot Wheels (TM) Fireball track which had been gathering dust in our garage ever since it failed to attract any buyers at our garage sale. I found it quite easy at first to just screw a few screws into the track and then the board, but realized in order to get everything to match up in the end, i needed to tape the pieces together at their connection points, and then lay them on top. Here is a shot of the taping job i did, nothing advanced, just wound it up a few times to make sure i would have a roundish spider in the end, not just a lopsided one (which it sort of still turned out to be, but that is a whole nother story.

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After i had both the sections of track taped up, i positioned them on top of the spider's body in such a way that it retained it's oval shape, but the pictures explain it far better than i could.

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After you have found the perfect configuration, (remember, this is your project, so creativity is encouraged) all you need to do is screw them down and into place. A little word of caution for afterwords, however, DO NOT PUT THE FABRIC ON AND EXPECT TO SEE A COMPLETED SPIDER BODY! THere are still many, many small bumps on it, and if you are a perfectionist wwhen it comes to small details in your yard, instead of the big picture, you will be very dissatisfied. All you need to shape up your spider is a pair of tin snips, or something else that can easily cut through plastic childrens toys (seem to have alot of those things laying around....:p) If you are not that much of a perfectionist and just want this project to be over, then go right ahead and proceed onto the next step, secureing the legs!!!! Duhn, duhn DUHN!!!

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soooooooo, to make a long story short, i've been kindof busy lately, but i am bound and determined that i will get this thing done by the end of the month! I SWEAR!:)

Back to the spider, and we are ready to put on the fron legs. Hopefully yuou took my advice earlier, and made the front legs out of the hollow noodles, if not, you are probabvly going to find this step to be a doosy. I started by placing the hinges on the spider to map out approximately where i wanted the legs to go. It took a bit of placing to find it, but i think i found perfect medium between the front and the side, so that they were forward, but not directly in the front right next to each other. This is your call, and if you were thinking by now, well i can at least get a nice static prop out of this and just leave the motor out, you are SADLY mistaken. :cool:

Warning, Self Conscious Rant:, Warning
Now, i may or may not have mentioned this, but this spider is a milestone for me. It represents my first step into the world of animated props. Granted it is only a small animation, and it is not perfect, but it is still my very first venture ever into this exciting new genre. SO, naturally it doesnt look like most of the other professional grade animated props on here, but it is still my best effort. That being said, if I had wanted a nice, cool looking static prop spider, I would have been all over this thing, making it way elaborate, detailed and far less cartoony as it turns out to look like. If you would like me to build a static spider you can bet your bottom i will build one to the nine, but this is just, unfortunately, an animated spider, and so i set out to build it to function first, and look good second (much to my own personal chagrin)
End of Self Conscious, Chocolate Induced Rant

Whew, well anyways, I think i may have already posted this pic, but it shows the position of the hinges on my spder in relation to the actual body.

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Here is a close up on exactly how the hinge was fastened to the base (on the bottom board remember). Think before screwing, "Does this hinge bend the right way?", and "Is this at too severe of an angle to the motor? Is my leg going to look like he is attacking, or waving at you?"

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Next, i took each fron leg and pulled the scarf back, revealing the pool noodle underneath. Then i took the noodle's open end and pushed it onto the end of the hinge. Using a long piece of wood, i noted the positions of the screw holes on the hinge and their locations in relation to the pool noodle. I then used a long screw and (carefully) screwed the leg onto the hinge, secureing it for a back up fail safe feature. Then i secured the actual leg with tons of duct tape to get a very tight and secure fit. By the end of this process, the leg was secure enough that it wasnt going anywhere anytime soon.

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After doing this, YOu will be just about set, but i found when testing my motor that when the arm made it's closest pass, the slack would cause the arm to lower to a point where it became too low for the motor to lift it anymore. Due to the unanticipated weight of the legs, the deer motor was discovered to not be able to lift the legs sufficiently when the hinges were ate their lowest point naturally (hanging down to the floor when on a bench). To solve this, i screwed several screws into the board directly behind the arm and placed some of the scarf around it. By liufting up the arm and drilling with the drill, the screw was able to act as a sort of fishing reel to wind up the loose slack in the scarf. By tightening this enough, i was able to get it so that it would naturally keep the legs suspended at the perfect height (about halfway retracted) at all times when there was no tension on the string from the motor. This next picture should explain all that pretty well, but unfortunately i did not think to get any pictures of the exact process of tensioning the scarfs, but i think you should get the basic gist of it.

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The only problem you may encounter is the scarves beginning to fray, and this can only be solved by further secureing them with only the strongest pieces of scarf. I am sorry i cannot offer any mnore inciteful advice, but to be honest, i really didnt have to contend with this problem at all. So, once this has been done, you can get the other leg mounted and start to get a semse of what this thing will end up looking like. Next up i will give my best attempt to try and explain how i attached the rest of the legs, and show how to finish attaching the legs to the motor to give this baby some life! Till then, I's Chevy Chase, and you're not:p.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, if you have been able to follow along so far, i have to say, i applaud your stamina. This project is one where i really didnt get a sense of how it would even work until the day i attached the motor, and just seeing that in action really helped me finish this baby up. I had been planning on using the flip camera to film the finished product and it's inner workings just for you as a special treat, because it would really have helped me at this point (had i been doing this based off of a tut instead of free birdin' it)*sigh*:(.....and wouldnt ya know it......A MOUSE ATE ALL THE WAY THROUGH THE BLEEPIN' EXTENSION CORD TO THE DEER MOTOR!!!!!! *pant* *pant* wheh, ugh *pant*, wow, well i am glad i got that off of my chest. Well, as i mentioned above, the whole video of the inner-workings and finished product thing probably wont be hapening until i can get me another one of those motors. So, sadly, i have to admit unto thee, i have no video, only pics of the spider at this point, so we will have to make due with what we have got for now. I am really sorry, and can only hope your spider wont become a mouse Mecca. FYI, the fabric i put on it comes off durring the winter, so it shoudlnt be, we just have super aggressive rats up here:p. Oh well:rolleyes:, until then i will just have to keep posting steps, and we are almost finished too!
 

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So, we have the front two feet mounted on their hinges, so the next logical step is to put the other legs on, right? well, not exactly. What you will need to do now is to get the legs strung up so they have some animation! Whoo-Hoo!:D

*Unnecessary Spiel About Use of the Spider Warning* Now, wait just one cotton' pickin' second there partner, i guess it is time to spill the beans about this animation. I think it is fairly obvious at this point that this prop is not intended for up close use (in a haunt, maze, etc.). Not that it couldnt be with a bit of tweaking, but i guess the main point i am trying to make here is that you are not going to get any sort of violent movements out of this guy, so if you were planning on using it for a startle effect, i would reconsider. Now you may be able to use it for misdirection, have them watching it, while a spider-webbed actor crawls out from a web obscuring him from view (hey, not a bad idea:)), but any how, i just wanted to bring up the fact that this will (most likely) be out in your yard for all sorts of weather, and that is where you may run into some problems with the motor. Well, not speciffically the motor, but the weight it can support. As the scarfs get wetter from rain, they get heavier, increasing the weight of the front legs. Depending on the type of motor you have, and the maximum pay load it can support, the motor may cease to work at all or begin only lifting each leg partially (this is only if your motor features an automatic reverse feature, which turns it around if the motor becomes blocked or stuck). If you begin to encounter these problems, it is most likely because the legs have begun to sag too far down when the string is loose whent he motor reaches the front of it's cycle. If this is the case, the quickest fix without having to scrap the motor or arms is to place an object (a skull, more webs, toxic waste barrel, etc.) underneath it to keep it from going back to the ground when the motor reaches the front again. This happened to me once, right after a wicked rain storm, and the scarfs didnt dry out for some time, that is why one of the legs is resting on a toxic waste barrel. Here is one of the pics from before to show how you may need to place the legs if they become to heavy at times for your motor to lift.

Ok, well, for some reason it isnt letting me upload these pics, so i guess you will just have to look at the ones on the previous page. I do warn you though, these were taken before the display was even finished, so the place is looking pretty bare and shabby.

Well, until the site starts letting me upload images again, i guess we will just have to play it by discription, and hope for the best, YIKES;)

To begin the process of stringing up your legs (ha, chalk another one up on the creepy phrasing counter for this tut:D), you need to makes sure that you're within an extension cord's length of a wall outlet. Once you are thers, you will need to take one of the metal staples you had from earlier, and position it directly above one of your spider's front legs. It doesnt matter which, you will be doing them both eventually. You need to make sure that it is failry close to the edge of the plywood, but not too close, or it may rip out or loosen with time. Hey, wouldnt you know, i fixed the problem with the pictures, so i quick better post them now. Here's a pic of where the staple should go about, but remember, each project is unique, so use your head when attaching it.

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ok, so now that you have pounded that in so you cant wiggle it with your hands, you will need to plug in the motor and run it until it is at the furthest point it will ever be from your leg. Then take the string you had tied on the nail coming off of the extension arm earlier (remember those?) and pull it through the staple. Brign the lag up to the point you want it to be when it is at it's highest point (i sugesst something around the point where the tip of the leg reaches up just two or three inches higher than the top of the body), and loop the string around the leg just below the bend in it. Mark the point where the string loops around and contacts itself so you wont forget the length when you tie it. I think it would be pretty obvious to most people, but me, being the dufus that i am, forgot to account for the fact that my extension arm may begin to swivel under stress, and so i tried to push the limits of the spider by having the string be at the tightest i could possibly have it at this back point, so it would bring the legs down faster than they went up, and so the entire motor ceased up at one point in testing, causing me a great deal of stress as well as the motor, so, all in all, i would say, be smart in where you think the furthest point is, and make the string just an inch or so longer than you estimated to save yourself the hassle later. Now, with the cut off length in mind, you should be all set to tie the string, but i would recomend tying the end of the string to some sort of nail to act like a thread and needle to thread the string through the scarf to mask it from view. After this, you should be good to go, so just tie it up, and move on to the next one. Once you have these done, you can move on to the other legs. I stupidly didnt take any pictures of this step, and now everything is packed away for the winter, but you need to basically take a large nail and pound it into the base board where you want the leg to go. Take the leg and slide it onto the nail's head. Once it is securely on there, you will need to secure it with duct tape until it will not move at all. Pay attention to the angles at which you attatch each foot, as it will likely not move too much when you put it outside. I actually attached the feet while it was outside so i could make sure they were in the correct place. Once you have the legs in place, you can hide the loose ends of the scarf inside the body. Next, using the sheet of fabric and the head, cut out a square of fabric that will fit over the entire head and bucket. (ummm, i did mention about that, didnt i?) Well, if i didnt, you probably want to fillout the head somehow. I used the bucket part of a dump truck which i had just lying around, but anything would do that suits your fancy. Anyways, after you have the head filled out, you need to cut out the square as mentioned above and, using the staple gun, staple the fabric to the bottom of the head, stretching it tightly over the filler. here is a shot of the bottom of the head after the stapling.

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If you are wondering about the eyes, they are the two halves of a styrofoam ball. I cut the ball in half, drew the rough outline of the compound eyes of a spider, and then i used a blunt pencil to form the surface of the ball into a textured surface. Then i used two colors of florescent spray paint (yellow and green) to give them a bumpy, eerie glow under the green flood light i used. I just attacked them with some liquid nails to the fabric (trust me, this time it worked, but next time maybe not, so i would advise using that to attach them. try hot glue). Finally (YES I MADE IT :D) you will need to cut the remaining fabric to fit over top of the body, and you should be just fine placing it over the exoskeleton and putting just a few strategic staples into it, and, viola one spider with animated front legs and a "menecing" presence.:cool:

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Discussion Starter #17
Trust me PHD, it is way easier than i thought it would be, and thank you for the input:).

Here are some more night pictures of our entire spider display, sorry about the shaky quality:eek:, but our ngith mode one our camera is quite touchy. The spider is the big black blob in the middle of the green::rolleyes:

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Good luck to all who try this project, and i really do thank all of you for taking this ride along with me on my first animated adventure. Please do omment if you have any questions, concerns or post soem pics of yours if you have been working on one or are done with one!:)
 
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