Halloween Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been working on carving my own tombstones out of 2" insulation foam..but realized that most people that install their own have a yard. Any one have any good ideas on the best way to make easy stands or how to mount these to make a grave yard on concrete?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
I've been working on carving my own tombstones out of 2" insulation foam..but realized that most people that install their own have a yard. Any one have any good ideas on the best way to make easy stands or how to mount these to make a grave yard on concrete?
I too am cursed by concrete. Every year I have to transform my concrete driveway into a cemetery. Attached are photos of how to build extruded foam tombstones so that you can display them in grass or on concrete. All supplies can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes.

727639


If you have multiple tombstones make a template so your hole locations are consistent. Use a masonry drill bit to drill the holes into the foam base of your tombstone. Make sure the drill bit is slightly larger than the outside diameter of the PVC pipe (if your using 3/4" PVC pipe then use 7/8" drill bit).


727640


Insert the PVC pipe into the hole, mark it and trim it to length. Use a construction adhesive (I used liquid nails) to set the pipe into the holes. To construct a base (not shown) for display on concrete use 1/2" or thicker exterior grade plywood. I made mine the width of the tombstone and the length was about 24"+- which allows 12"+- to the front and back of the tombstone. For the support attachments (not shown) I used wooden dowels, diameter should be about 1/8" smaller than the inside diameter of your PVC pipe. Insert them into the PVC pipe, mark and trim to length. Use a 2" or longer deck screw to attach the wooden dowels to the plywood base (screw from the bottom-up). Now your all set. This method will allow installation in grass by means of driving metal rebar into the ground and sliding the tombstone over it or using the plywood/wooden dowel stand to display on any hard surface; you can also use the stand on grass if you want. To conceal the stand just cover with mulch, dirt or pieces of burlap (see photos below).


727641

Displayed on grass with rebar supports


727642

Displayed on concrete driveway with plywood stand covered in mulch

Hope this helps....
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
@JCO Thank you for sharing your video. The base is a simple and convincing approach. I also appreciate all the detail you give with your painting technique. I have quite a few carved, but no letters yet. I want to try different techniques on each to get a variety. @The Skeleton Crew This is also very helpful! I'm still not sure which way I will tackle this. After I posted this, I realized I have another challenge which is how to also avoid theft or vandalism. I live in a townhouse and the would be graveyard is just feet from the sidewalk... there is a gate, but no way to lock it because the neighbors have to use it to get in and out. Anyway! I was also curious on how you got your letters and stone texture? Is it just a painting technique, or did you put something on the surface first?
Thanks again to you both for your replies
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
940 Posts
Similar to the above suggestions, make your base out of wood to give it a bit of weight. Try to create multiple levels using 2x6, 2x4, 2x2 or 1x2. By the time you've done that, the base is going to be pretty heavy. Both the tombstones below have bases of solid wood that use 2X6 and the smaller 1x2 surrounds glued and screwed together then painted in the same fashion as the foam. Their weight as you can see makes them easy to stand up just about anywhere. The banshee is also hollow inside the perimeter of the wood base. (That comes into play two suggestions down.)

727671


All our smaller tombstones stand on their own where our concrete patio is used to create our Pet Semetery. It's an evolving project, but as you can see we put down tarps, put the tombstones into place, and then add plenty of wood chips which we get for free from Chip Drop. We actually use the chips in our garden out back. Having the tarps in place lets us roll them up at the end of Halloween night and carry the chips back to the yard with very little effort. Directly behind the tarps is an actual section of garden, and the chips just make the whole area flow together as one scene.

727667


One other option if you're making much larger tombstones is to make your tombstones hollow in such a way as they can fit over a cement block. This is sort of the reverse of sticking stakes into the ground as the cement block will help keep the tombstone in place when the wind picks up. We don't have much of a problem with wind where the Pet Semetery is located, but further from the house, any tombstone not staked down will have to have some way to keep it from wandering on windy nights. A standard cinder block fits inside the tombstone below and it stays put pretty well. It was one of our first attempts to keep tombstones down on the ground where stakes were not feasible. If we were going to do it again we would do both the heavy wood sides, and the hollow area for a cinder block.

727668
727670
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
@chubstuff This is another great suggestion. Thanks for sharing. I might try this with some of my bigger tombstones. The pet semetary idea is really fun.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top