Halloween Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
720873
720874

I have this 12ft Tall clown mouth I created with plywood, hand drawn, and painted. It's a project I have been working on and off for years. It's held up with rope around the house's columns and through the slack of the plywood and Vertically stacked 2x4s. By luck it hasn't fallen. I need to figure out a low cost way to make it stable, but also able to be broken down and rebuilt easily for storage. Right now it's stored in my garage standing up with just the half folded in.
20181031_205813.jpg 20171009_133237.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,488 Posts
Is there some way that you can lift up the panels in the soffit and see if there are some 4"x4"s or 2"x6"s above the panels that you could maybe screw some eye screws to or run some eye bolts through? Then on the top panel of your clown you could add more eye screws or eye bolts and then use some cable or paracord to hang it. Then secure the lower sections to the columns. I can't think of any other way to secure it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Is there some way that you can lift up the panels in the soffit and see if there are some 4"x4"s or 2"x6"s above the panels that you could maybe screw some eye screws to or run some eye bolts through? Then on the top panel of your clown you could add more eye screws or eye bolts and then use some cable or paracord to hang it. Then secure the lower sections to the columns. I can't think of any other way to secure it.
Thanks for the suggestion, but that would be too heavy for the soffit. I'm more concern with completely stabilizing the bottom part because it's starting to warp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Can you post a picture of the backside of the prop as normally installed? What materials are the columns constructed from? What thickness is the plywood? I have a few ideas, but need more data.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Can you post a picture of the backside of the prop as normally installed? What materials are the columns constructed from? What thickness is the plywood? I have a few ideas, but need more data.
I don't have back up yet. Planning on doing that next weekend. Here's a couple of pics while in storage. The plywood is 1/4" thick.
back side
720996
Front side:
720999
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
And the house's columns are, stucco over...? I'm going to assume the columns are structural. And, three panels of 1/4 inch ply and the woodstock will clock in around 150lbs on a bad day.

Anyway, I think I came up with a couple of ideas for securing the whole thing better while keeping it easy'ish to disassemble for storage.

However, because the plywood is so thin, I'm going to forewarn that all methods will require a little filler and touch-up painting to the frontside clown image. Also, it looks like at least 1 panel is not plywood, but is in fact some kind of MDF...which is HEAVY. If it is the topmost panel, it might be worth swapping out for plywood in the future.

Pictured below

Dark blue is the ply panels.

Green represents 2x2 wood stock

Light blue represents 3x3 OR 2x4 wood stock

Red dots mean screws that are attached from the face into the stock on the backside

Yellow and Orange Arrows represent screws or bolts with washers and nuts that get predrilled through the centers of the 2x2 in opposing directions. You can also screw/bolt from one direction only for ease of assembly, but with screws alternating entry points and not going completely through allows for more fasteners due to spacing.

Pictured in orange also includes heavy duty eyebolts to be attached to the light blue 3x3 or 2x4 wood stock.

I'm not 100% what order my photos actually uploaded in, and in preview it looks like everything uploaded twice for reasons I don't understand, but here's the idea: Where your vertical panels butt-joint to your horizontal spanning panel, you're going to attach a 2x2 cleating system. Now, the wood stock takes the weight of the panels, rather than the edges of the ply.

The green cleating system will be inset to accomodate the stock widths of either a 3x3 or 2x4, which will be attached like a frame to be flush with the vertical panels, and one edge of the horizontal panel. The inner-most 3x3/2x4 upright, where people walkthrough, extends to the horizontal panel to be attached in the outer 1/3rds. Now, if what I drew would make a 3x3 or 2x4 visible through the clown's mouth, I can suggest a work-around.

At the bottom of the 2 vertical panels, there is an optional staking system to keep the panels fixed to one point in the ground.

The big addition is the use of braided steel cable and turnbuckles with heavy duty eyebolts to secure the panels to the columns. You'd have to figure the best placement for the eyebolts- I'm assuming into the centered side of the 3x3/2x4. But, depending on what tensions better, you might end up doing a combination of eyebolts into the side and face of the wood stock. You may also want to span the cable to lace on just one side of each panel, rather than have the cable span across both upright woodstocks. I can't tell from your pics if the column would be centered behind each panel or not? Even if it isn't, spanning the cable across both woodstock uprights would be best, as no panel twisting would be possible.

The cabling could be run as three continuous pieces: one for going across the top panel to secure to the columns; upper corner behind the two columns to the other upper corner. Then, one level start of cabling side to side, then zig-zagging to the bottom on each vertical each side. With the turn buckle, there is very little chance for accidental movement in the ply. You'll need to get the saddle hardware for the wire to clamp off the ends of the wire, as the steel is virtually impossible to knot by hand.

So, hopefully this can get you going in the right direction to keep everything ridgid and secured to the house. Good luck!


721039
721040
721041
721042
721043
Panel Reinforcement_0(1).jpg
Panel Reinforcement_2.jpg
Panel Reinforcement_1.jpg
Panel Reinforcement_3.jpg
Panel Reinforcement_4.jpg
Panel Reinforcement_0(1).jpg
Panel Reinforcement_2.jpg
Panel Reinforcement_1.jpg
Panel Reinforcement_3.jpg
Panel Reinforcement_4.jpg
Panel Reinforcement_4.jpg Panel Reinforcement_3.jpg Panel Reinforcement_1.jpg Panel Reinforcement_2.jpg Panel Reinforcement_0(1).jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
And I JUST realized zooming in that you stacked your plywood panels on their horizontal axis, not their verticals, so add 2x4s/3x3s upright framing flush on the panel edges and at least two more about 2 ft apart to brace the middle of the panels. You'll need to add more green cleats between the upright wood stocks for the length of the panel. The construction technique is the same, but the dimensions will be different.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top