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Discussion Starter #1
This will probably be for next year, but I want to make a costume based off the attached image. My concerns are; I don't know how to add the extra bulk, and I can't find fur that's long enough. It looks to be a 12 inch pile on the arms and legs, and longer on the chest.
724233
 

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There are some really good builds of screen accurate Chewbacca costumes out there. If you can't find a step by step let me know, I may have a link or two saved. (Add therpf to your search)
 

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Thanks, I will look. Chewbacca is close to sasquatch at least in the body. Most of the sasquatch costumes I find are too baggy and too ape like.
 

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I don't know that I have the patience to hand tie that much hair though. Looking at some of the Chewbacca costume builds, they are amazing, but a lot of work.
 

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Why is it that you spend all that time hand tying the fur only to cut 1/2 it off?
 

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I think in this case that it's a specific wookie they are trying to get to be screen accurate. Not sure you'd have to get that detailed with a squatch or any other long haired creature. The hunt for screen accuracy can drive even sane people to do crazy things.
 

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I've been working on a werewolf costume [for over a decade because I cannot settle on how I want to make it] and I've been testing a method for making extra long fur without spending thousands on a few yards of NFT or wefts of hair. I got the idea after buying a cheap ghillie suit.

You'll need at minimum: smallish knit mesh fabric [my test build was on this], a lot of yarn [I like roving yarn because it's loosely spun but it seems almost any yarn can work], a rug latching hook, combs, a lint roller, and a lot of patience [podcasts and background noise movies/tv shows help].

I sewed a mesh shirt together, marked out the 'nodes' where I wanted the yarn with colored markers [different colors for different lengths], then rug latched it to the mesh. After completing some rows, I combed the yarn out, unraveling it back to it's hairy state. A zipper is easy to hide, the "fur" can be really closely spaced and dense or loosely spread out. I made some test patches to try out different spacing combinations, my next attempt will have rows that stagger with alternating long/short yarn because it ends up looking like more natural hair. I also tested a little bit with water based leave in conditioners to reduce the fluffiness of the combed yarn but I haven't figured out the right method there.
With rug latching the yarn should be cut a little more than twice what the finished length you intend. My first test shirt was latched using 3", 4", 6" and 8" strands leaving the "fur" anywhere from 1.5" to 4" long when finished. And when you comb you will get a lot of fiber out! A lot! Just a warning. Running a felting needle through the knots a few times before combing should help keep the yarn more secure, and reduce the risk of pulling them out.

It's only about 80% as intensive as hair tying... :ROFLMAO:




 

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It's cold, rainy and windy here, so I slipped it on and stepped outside for a couple minutes too see if it'll keep me warm.
Wind passes through it no problem, when I finalize my werewolf I'll probably have an outdoor and indoor option for what I wear under it. A t-shirt is plenty fine indoors and in mild weather, but some kind of long sleeve thermal undershirt might be more comfortable in colder weather.

That test also confirms part of my theory behind doing all of this. Regular faux fur has a bad habit of being very toasty and sweaty to wear if you make a whole shirt or something, and I wanted something a little more breathable. This, so far, is very breathable.
 
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