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Discussion Starter #1
Hello

Well I'm stuck at home like so many of you the last few weeks. I have a project I had completely forgot about.I purchased a skeleton monkey last year from target.
I am new to corpsing.
I have a "pirate corner" in my living room. I thought I would like to make a Undead Jack the monkey. I debated on making it look like a 19th century taxidermy or really corpse him up like Jack.

My question is has anyone tried using Liquid Acrylic instead of Liquid Latex?

I want to use the supplies I have on hand. I also have panty hose, plastic sheeting and a heat gun and many other misc supplies to work with.

I think I want to decide his final position before I start the process. He is only positional vertically so I'll likely take him apart and find a glue that is strong enough to keep him in place.

Thank you for any help! I hope ya'll are knee deep in a project.
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Typical Ghoul Next Door
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I haven't done corpsing before, but I would think using liquid latex and hosery is a good plan from what I've seen of past corpsing projects, and going for a smaller skeleton (monkey) is smart for a first try. I hope you post photos!
 

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From my experience liquid acrylic (gesso) will not give you the desired flexibility like liquid latex when it dries. Gesso is used to prep canvas materials to paint on. So when it dries it's meant to be more rigid while liquid latex is more "rubber" like and flexible. I bet you have glue laying around somewhere. Mix it 50/50 with water and soak paper towels, toilet paper or cotton (t-shirts) in it and use it as a mache to form "skin". When dry you can paint it with latex or acrylic paint to achieve the desired effect. This will give you a similar effect to liquid latex.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Allen Hopps had a fun tutorial using the plastic bag idea. Since you already have it on hand, it might work.

This is the tutorial I had in mind. I'm still dragging my feet on this. The little guy I'm working on will be in my home full time on display .So, I would like to pay attention to detail and my concern now that I have let some time go by is the plastic and heat gun technique wont give me the detail that I want.
I see that there is so much you can do with layering and using other supplies. I feel like im stuck in cement and cant get started.....
My husband said he was too dark, and I have to agree. The corner/table he's going on is in a darkish corner. I took some thinner to him and wiped much off.
This is "supposed" so be a practice corpse.
 

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If you're going to have the corpse on display year round, it definitely is worth your while to do a much more detailed job than you would get using plastic. There is a big difference between having a prop out on Halloween night that passersby look at and a household decoration that people can enjoy at their leisure up close. Here's another Halloween Forum member who has taken corpsing to a new level. Oak Lane Cemetery has quite a few tutorials about corpsing and methods to get what you want.


Despite the incredible detail that is showing in the above video, it's a bit too graphic for our haunt, so we're opting to make any future zombies we might include more akin to Mr. Chicken's version of a corpse zombie. He's a bit more cartoonish, and while frightening, not too much so for younger kids.


Pick and choose the effects and approaches that work for you, and if you're locked up in your house like we are, have fun cruising around YouTube an other places to discover multiple ways of corpsing. There are some amazing artists out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If you're going to have the corpse on display year round, it definitely is worth your while to do a much more detailed job than you would get using plastic. There is a big difference between having a prop out on Halloween night that passersby look at and a household decoration that people can enjoy at their leisure up close. Here's another Halloween Forum member who has taken corpsing to a new level. Oak Lane Cemetery has quite a few tutorials about corpsing and methods to get what you want.


Despite the incredible detail that is showing in the above video, it's a bit too graphic for our haunt, so we're opting to make any future zombies we might include more akin to Mr. Chicken's version of a corpse zombie. He's a bit more cartoonish, and while frightening, not too much so for younger kids.


Pick and choose the effects and approaches that work for you, and if you're locked up in your house like we are, have fun cruising around YouTube an other places to discover multiple ways of corpsing. There are some amazing artists out there.
Holey smokes!! Oak Lane does some amazing work. I like Mr Chicken too, but looking for an in between look. Thank you for sharing that.
Yep, agreed about detail and taking my time. My husband just came in to check on me and asked how the eyes were going.Ha, "your so picky". I think this guy is going to take me longer that I thought.
 

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Holey smokes!! Oak Lane does some amazing work. I like Mr Chicken too, but looking for an in between look.
My husband just came in to check on me and asked how the eyes were going.Ha, "your so picky". I think this guy is going to take me longer that I thought.
I have chatted with the talent behind Oak Lane Cemetery, and I wish everyone had that opportunity. That's because his videos make everything look so easy. But when you ask him specific questions about what he does, then all of the hours of frustration that he bypasses for the sake of making a five minute video comes through. It is one of the weaknesses of the medium, I suppose. A twenty minute rant in the middle of a tutorial about the frustrations of getting things to work, and the untold hours that go undocumented just won't fly in the world of YouTube. But then again, you rarely see those serendipitous moments that make the prop magic that the artist couldn't repeat if you paid them.

So take heart, you are wallowing in the graves that many have dug before. Your creation will take time. Remember Dr. Frankenstein. If you want something to turn out right, you probably need to be a bit more patient and use the best ingredients available. :)
 
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