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Hello Ghouls and Fiends,

I for one am not a big fan of Today's Horror movies. I'm prefer the Classics. I know some of you on here are fan of today's horror movies.

Some People say the old classics are boring and NOT scary. Some make fun of how cheaply made they were, like pointing out the string on Dracula's in bat form or point out how small the coffin was Nosferatu was carrying. I used to have a friend that didn't like black and white films, in fact, he wouldn't watch a film from 2010, that's how picky he was!

Anyway, the classics have something today's horror doesn't. Monsters. Monsters are out of style and many people don't even care for them. I'm talking about Dracula, Frankenstein's Monster, Nosferatu, the creature from the Black Lagoon, Phantom of the Opera, and Wolf Man!

Some people don't find neither of these movies scary, but don't you think they at least deserve credit for being the first Horror Movies? I personally think they should do a remake of all of these movies and make them as scary as possible! (No Gore).

To people, these movies were scary back then. All of us have just gotten spoiled with the gore. One person mentioned in another thread I started that instead of showing what happens to someone, just let the person imagine what it could have looked like! That let's your own brain play a part in the movie.

Let's see here, the newer Chainsaw Massacres, Friday the 13th, the Newer Halloweens, A Nightmare on Elm's Street, Saw, Children's Play, and other films. I admit they can be scary, but a lot of them are gory.

Even the old Halloween was more tame than these!

We can't forget about zombies. How popular have they gotten? Zombies are like today's scary creature. They all are starting to replace even the newer films I just mentioned!

I like the Walking Dead, but everywhere I go there is something about zombies, it gets annoying after a while if you ask me.

So, therefore my idea is for people to start creating remake horror films, but make them as scary as possible!

Although, I do see newer Horror films becoming less gory. I think the gore age is heading down the toilet.
 

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I like some movies from all eras. I'd watch a remake of creature from the black lagoon. They have remade Frankenstein and Dracula. One of my favorites is Van Helsing.
 

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Old Horror movies and horror comic books caught "Hell" back then for perverting our youth. The Fed. Government went after those real scary comic books and dictated what couldnt be shown (The Comics Code)
I think some of the popularity of the old movies happened during WW2 because at the finale of most of those old movies the monster was done away with, which translated in many minds as equating with the US eventually beating Germany and Japan.
All movies no matter how scary back then were just mild distractions from the real, gory blood-letting going on in the war and the REAL loss and heartbreak created by this warfare.
I have always marveled at the 1920's German films, made in a war-beaten country where food was short , along with everything else, yet they made some fantastic movies ! WOW!
 

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Get a copy of the silent movie "HAXAN" and show this to your modern movie lover friends. They will see things in this black & white old film you will never see anyplace else.
 

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His name is Roger Clyne
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I like ALL horror movies, it just depends on my mood. Sometimes I wanna see a body count, sometimes I wanna see Norman Bates talking about how mother isn't herself today.

Gore isn't going away, it's just part of the process of change. Once upon a time Universal was THE horror studio, then Hammer came along in the late 50s & early 60s & they brought us the classic monsters in color with more blood & boobs, the late 60s gave us Romero & what we all know as the zombies of today, then Tobe Hooper gave us a little more gore in the original Texas Chainsaw, Blatty gave us the scariest little girl up until that point & then Friedken brought her to life & gave us another twist in the horror genre, it's all just part of the process, people pushing the envelope.

I like that. I don't want the same stuff, that's boring. I wanna see someone push the envelope & take it one step too far. Sometimes that's with gore, sometimes it's not. You need to check out Japanese, Italian, French, etc. horror, they're the new frontier.

That said, I personally think gore is getting boring because things like Saw & Hostel have done it over the top & (pun intended) to death. I prefer an Insidious to the latest Hostel.

But it's not going away & our monsters have changed. How can a kid find Lugosi's Dracula scary when real people are blowing up buildings, shooting up their own schools?

New is needed. Sometimes that means gore, sometimes it doesn't. Plus horror goes through changes every 10 years or so. In the early 90s they said horror was dead, studios wouldn't back any really big, new horror & then a studio like Full Moon comes around & starts making indie stuff again & you get the right movie at the right time & then it's everywhere again.

Horror is in a real renaissance at the moment on tv & in theatres. Walking Dead, American Horror, Grimm, this fall we get Sleepy Hollow & a new Dracula. So don't despair.

There's always going to be fans of the great early classics, we gotta keep Turner Classic Movies in business, but you also have to remember that some kid out there will see The Conjuring & be blown away & that will be his/her classic instead of Saw.
 

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But it's not going away & our monsters have changed. How can a kid find Lugosi's Dracula scary when real people are blowing up buildings, shooting up their own schools?

In the early 90s they said horror was dead, studios wouldn't back any really big, new horror & then a studio like Full Moon comes around & starts making indie stuff again & you get the right movie at the right time & then it's everywhere again.
Perhaps a pants-sagging, backwards hat-wearing Dracula that raps and hold his victims at gunpoint as he plunges his blinged-out fangs into their necks?:p

*Laments* I miss what Full Moon used to be:rolleyes:

In a way, I blame Scream and the [email protected] parodies for making a mockery of any previous horror films and setting the genre back for quite awhile by lowering the mentality to the lowest common denominator and using only pretty faces. Next, it seemed to become a game of "let's see who can one-up everyone as to the amount of gore" and the 'torture porn' sensation caught on. Now, while there are some decent films on occasion, like RCIAG stated, quite a bit of the best horror is seen on television. Horror will not go away; it may get knocked down, but it will keep getting back up, even if the process takes longer than some would like.
 

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Perhaps a pants-sagging, backwards hat-wearing Dracula that raps and hold his victims at gunpoint as he plunges his blinged-out fangs into their necks?:p
BAHAHAHAHA! That was hilarious Garth. I still love the old stuff. There's a charm to them, and they are nostalgic for me. And they DO still creep me out. I just watched The Creature not two weeks ago. That movie still holds up for me, especially some of the underwater scenes. I know the main reason is it scared me as a child. That stuff gets to be part of our DNA and it's hard to shake old fear. A lot of fears are relative. So I understand why a younger generation is more fearful of blood and guts. That stuff doesn't scare me, I went to school in Detroit :p

Anyone ever see this:

image.jpg

This movie scared me to death as a child. I just found it on Amazon and recently re-watched it. Now it didn't scare me like it did as a kid, but I still had a few creepy moments (it's early seventies, the fashion is just horrible:rolleyes:). The special effects are nothing extraordinary, but I do find the makeup and costumes do be done fairly well.
 

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His name is Roger Clyne
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*Laments* I miss what Full Moon used to be:rolleyes:

Horror will not go away; it may get knocked down, but it will keep getting back up, even if the process takes longer than some would like.
I was a vid store clerk during the Full Moon heyday & it was awesome. We'd get all kinds of screeners so I'd get to see them early. I still have one or 2 Full Moon toys. I passed most of them on to someone here but I kept my Castle Freak & one other I can't remember.

I loved Scream & the sequels. It was smart & it "got" all the classic horror cliches turned them on their ear. It made other filmmakers step up their game. Much like Cabin In The Woods has done with that whole genre.

That was a dark time for horror, even then they were sounding the death knell for it. But, like a good monster, sometimes it hides in its coffin, gets some rest then comes back in a different form.
 

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I liked Scream as well. I thought it was very clever. Cabin in the Woods was also great. I had no idea what it was, I just rented it one night. Really surprised me!
 

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Like a lot of responders here I'm all over the map, with maybe just a little more love for the old classics and not so much for the high body count gore fest. If it's a great scary movie for whatever reason I will probably like it. I have posted this link in the "Horror Discussion" section here already but I go and watch some of these oldies online now and then in all their b&w glory. There are some real pieces of cheese here that I've never heard of but even some of those are fun to watch just to see how bad/well they pull off the props and costumes(not to mention the acting). http://archive.org/search.php?query=Horror%20sci%20fi%20AND%20mediatype%3Amovies These are all free public domain for anyone that wants to see them.
 

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Maybe a big difference between old Horror movies and the much newer ones is that the old stories might have come directly to the silver screen via a storytelling tradition in which the storyteller relishes every pause, ponders every nuance as they themselves are loving what they are doing from the beginning, setting the scene, the mood then proceeding weaving an interesting tale that usually had the ability to somewhat surprise us.
By comparison a fast paced cutter-movie usually doesn't do such time consuming things because they are going for the maximum number of bodies? (And the film is running, time is ticking....)
Most old movies were into character development no matter what they happened to be , a War movie, Western or even adventure movies.
To make us care about the characters made us also care about the story as those characters moved through it. Excellent scripts and good acting made us "buy" their fantasy, make it all more real and important in our lives.
Many times those actors and actresses seemed more so like real people to us, so the old tabloids held the power to ruin our fantasies, if they felt like it.
Taking the time and effort to hook into one's imagination is where entertainment should always try to go or make happen to be a viable and better product.
 

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Part 2: "Hooking into one's imagination" was also a trust issue between the members of the audience and the makers of the movie. Crass "Violation" of that trust might be thrilling and stimulating to some audience members, but may be nightmarish for some others and turn them away from attending movies made by those same people again.
We have a "Trust" here with the people who attend our haunted house too.
I am always mindful of that as we entertain them since our livelihood depends upon giving them their money's worth, yet not alienating them.
I have spent a lot of time during these last 26 years explaining to them before they buy a ticket the things we will NOT be doing here to them while they are in our care.
 

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My Horror movie watching generally stops at 1980. My favorites were all made between 1931 and 1979: Dracula, Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, Salem's Lot, Psycho, Halloween, etc.

I will watch 1980 Horror films, but they are different from what came before -- they take themselves less seriously, which I don't like. But there are a couple of Stephen King titles and a few in the Halloween series that are well done. Other than Scream and some other titles, the 1990s are pretty void of good films. The 2000s were even worse, with Trick or Treat being the exception. Recently, there has been more hope for the genre. I'm thinking that the 2010s bring a revival of good Horror filmmaking. Between Woman in Black and The Conjuring, quality is back in style.
 

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His name is Roger Clyne
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You missed a fairly good decade by skipping the 90s. You had to look but there was good stuff out there. It was the lean years for horror, but good stuff was being made & it gave us the man that would make the LOTR trilogy, The Hobbit trilogy & wins Oscars for them.

It also gave us a fave of many here, Hocus Pocus (though that's not really horror).

The 90s also gave a horror movie it's first Oscar win ever, Silence of the Lambs, which was also one of 3 movies to ever take the big 4 Oscars (Best Actress, Actor, Director & Picture).

The 90s gave us the game changer Scream (& the sequels), Peter Jackson's Dead Alive, Blair Witch (another BIG game changer), Ravenous (If you die first, I'm DEFINITELY gonna eat you), Tremors, From Dusk til Dawn, Jacob's Ladder, it gave us Pennywise & Ash, it was the decade that gave us the original Ring & Audition (the Japanese make some truly effed up horror that should be watched despite its effed-up-edness). We got the original Buffy the Vampire Slayer in movie form which gave us the great TV series Buffy, we got a new iconic looking Dracula in Gary Oldman & another new horror icon in Candyman, there were smaller movies like Dellamorte Dellamore (aka Cemetary Man), I Zombie, there was a lot of good stuff in the 90s even the Full Moon movies are worth watching.

Here's a pretty good list (though not mine) of 90s flicks worth watching:
http://www.imdb.com/list/FY2LkAmFm7s/

Granted it also gave us a ton of Leprechaun, Chucky & Wishmaster sequels, but it wasn't all crap. I mean really, there's crap every decade. It's what keeps horror hosts in business, bad B or C or D rated horror flicks.

It's like SNL. People are always saying "oh (insert favourite cast here) was the best SNL & all the rest are crap." They're forgetting that in EVERY cast & EVERY year there's crap, usually the whole last half hour of SNL is crap no matter what year. There was crap in the original 70s cast as well as every cast ever since.

Same goes for horror, there's always gonna be crap & cheap imitations, you just gotta search & sift through a few pieces of crap to get to the good stuff.
 

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BAHAHAHAHA! That was hilarious Garth. I still love the old stuff. There's a charm to them, and they are nostalgic for me. And they DO still creep me out. I just watched The Creature not two weeks ago. That movie still holds up for me, especially some of the underwater scenes. I know the main reason is it scared me as a child. That stuff gets to be part of our DNA and it's hard to shake old fear. A lot of fears are relative. So I understand why a younger generation is more fearful of blood and guts. That stuff doesn't scare me, I went to school in Detroit :p

Anyone ever see this:

View attachment 168840

This movie scared me to death as a child. I just found it on Amazon and recently re-watched it. Now it didn't scare me like it did as a kid, but I still had a few creepy moments (it's early seventies, the fashion is just horrible:rolleyes:). The special effects are nothing extraordinary, but I do find the makeup and costumes do be done fairly well.
This is one that scared me to death too as a kid along with Trog and Night of the Lepus. Something about giant killer bunnies just freaked me out :)
 

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Like most others that have replied, my love of horror covers new and old. Currently I would say my favorite movie is The Black Cat with Bela and Boris. On the other end I really liked A Serbian Film; a film movie that could certainly be tagged with the torture porn label but once you move past that gore there is an interesting story and point being made by the director.

Gore has a place and can be very effective but at the same time directors like Tobe Hopper proved that you can make a truly horrific and unsettling film without gore.

Films I wold suggest had well placed gore would be both the William Lustig "Manic" and its modern remake that came out this year for most of us.
Both of these are great movies that put you in the shoes of the killer for the entire movie which is an odd experience. The PoV aspect of the movie gives it a sleazy and grim tone as we watch the movie through the eyes of an unstable man.

Another good option for well placed gore is Valhalla Rising. Maybe not traditionally what some would call horror but a few scenes of ultra violence, a mind crushing atmosphere and a hypnotic soundtrack make this movie an amazing trip through the bowels of despair. As for the story being told take it for what you will I'm not sure it is really relevant to how the movie works.

As for zombie movies.....I'm done. When pop culture sinks its talons into something......(eh hem Doctor Who)..... it crushes its story telling soul. It then becomes an adventure trying to find the diamond in the giant turd pile it has become. There are lots of great zombie films and the best one I have seen in modern times is Pontypool. It is not your traditional zombie movie and the zombies don't really appear more then two or three times in the film. For a fan of classic horror this is a must see zombie film. It is like watching a radio drama that leaves most everything up to your imagination.

New or old I tend to lean towards the old but I am always searching for the new gems that are out there. I will still spend my Octobers glued to TCM and their wonderful Halloween programing.

There are lots of great podcasts out there that do a great job covering both old and new. I would recommend Horror Etc, 1951 Down Place and B-Movie Cast. These are not the only ones I listen to but are probably my favorites. They do a good job of helping you find the old and new gems in horror films.
 

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You missed a fairly good decade by skipping the 90s. You had to look but there was good stuff out there. It was the lean years for horror, but good stuff was being made & it gave us the man that would make the LOTR trilogy, The Hobbit trilogy & wins Oscars for them.

It also gave us a fave of many here, Hocus Pocus (though that's not really horror).

The 90s also gave a horror movie it's first Oscar win ever, Silence of the Lambs, which was also one of 3 movies to ever take the big 4 Oscars (Best Actress, Actor, Director & Picture).
Other than Scream and Silence, I do not personally care for many 1990s films: too little substance, too much focus on gimmicks like sex and gore. This has only gotten worse in recent years, with movies like Saw.

Hocus Pocus is fun, but I've always viewed it as more of a Halloween special than a Horror film. (It practically went straight to TV after release.) The 1990s had some decent Halloween specials.

I really despise Bram Stoker's Dracula. They stole the entire plot from Dark Shadows and Dan Curtis's version of Dracula. It had nothing to do with Bram Stoker's original book or character.

To each his own, but I will always love Horror films for what they were as opposed to what they have become.
 

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I'm a big fan of the old classics. They're like comfort food for the old Baron. I remember watching the old Universal classics with my Father when I was very young. We even had a few on 8mm film reels in the days before VCR.

In the sixties, as kids we used to try to sneak into the local cinema to watch the Hammer movies. For most of the lads, it was about getting a glimpse of boobs or a drop of blood in "Glorious Technicolor", but for me, it was about catching a few moments of Messrs' Cushing and Lee and the wonderful, spooky and atmospheric sets before we were caught and chucked out.(yeah, I was a strange child...)
No CGI.. everything in those movies relied on the skills of the effects artists and those of the actors to portray characters that one could identify and sympathise with. The "Monsters" had a sense of purpose.. not just there to bump off a few teenagers high on marijuana and wearing few, if any, clothes.

Although I have enjoyed some post-1980 movies, (and at the risk of sounding prudish), Gratuitous sex, violence and profanity for the sake of it just doesn't do it for me and to be frank, I'm just about done to death with zombies.

I realise that Horror movies have always been about pushing the boundaries. When Universal released Frankenstein (1931) there was public outcry over several scenes, which prompted the introduction of the "H" for "Horrific" certificate. Nowadays, of course most kids don't find it even remotely frightening.
The sixties gave us a taste of things to come with Hammer's blood and bare boobs, then along came "The Exorcist"(1973) which took things to a whole new level.

The eighties and nineties gave us (amongst others) the Childs Play and Friday 13th Franchise, many of which which showed a lot more than a heaving bosom (although I did enjoy the original "Halloween" and "Hellraiser")
Now we have such delights as Tom Six's "The human centipede" and the whole torture porn genre.

One must question as to how much further the boundaries can be pushed, or has the horror genre gone as far as it can go in that respect?
 

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I think the classic movies (Black Lagoon, Frankenstein, Dracula, The Mummy...) showed more creativity because they didn't have the technology. They had to have a story and an actual script rather than just FX and gore.

I did a Classic Monster theme one year because I also feel they are overlooked. I also agree that gore is on the way out.
 
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