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I've seen several questions about latex, but no one has mentioned the technique that I use...so here's my secret (and cheap) weapon for corpsing and such.

Flat Latex Paint.

I'm sure that I borrowed this idea from someone ages ago, but for me, it works just as well as regular latex at a fraction of the cost (especially if it's "oops" paint from Home Depot). Ok, I'm no artist...so keep that in mind. I usually just dip the cotton, papertowels, spider webs, etc. right into the can, squeeze out the excess by dragging it between my fingers and then slap it on. (SLAP) It's fast, cheap & effective.

If you're doing some special project and your paint is too runny, just leave the lid off of it for a few days to thicken it.

And from what I understand, if you use Exterior grade, it contains and anti-molding agent. ...'cuz we don't like things to actually BE moldy, we just want them to look that way, right?

Recently, I read here somewhere that there are Elastomeric paints that really seal things water tight...which I presume latex paint does too, but probably much better. So, maybe that's the way to go with paper mache and other delicate props.
 

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Wow..what a cool idea. I'll have to try that with next years props! Thanks!
 

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Sounds like a great idea....So instead of creating something by applying, say cotton, then brushing latex over it..You would just use regular latex paint. I can see where buying a big pale of it would be much cheaper than the little bottles of latex they sell. Does the latex paint stick as well. I know that when they do the corpsing with cotton, they attach the cotton with the latex first, they brush another layer of latex over it. For large props, this would probably cost a fortune.

Also, do you have any pics of things you have made using this technique.

Rob
 

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This is exactly what I did on my grandpa prop and my ground breaker corpse.
works great and holds up well.. not flexible like latex so much but it works well. just keep an eye on the oops paint as mentioned. I check the rack all the time.



his neck is a tshirt slathered with latex painter's caulk then painted with acrylic craft paint. it's totally flexible and falls like loose neck skin nicely.


this groundbreaker is snotrag mache using latex paint over a foam wig head.









the teeth are real easy.. just take an impression of your teeth in non-toxic clay like playdoh.. then fire up the hot glue gun and fill your mold with hot glue.. set it aside a while and bam.. .you got life-sized teeth.. paint'em up and stick 'em in.

i really like the texture papertowels give.. a nice lumpy skin texture when you use this method as shown on the back of the head above. just don't get the quilted flowers brand.. unless .. you know.. you're into that sort of thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, serpensphile!

Lurks in the Shadows, pure paint is certainly not as strong as MM, but it's also probably a little lighter & maybe more waterproof. It sounds like they both have their strengths in prop making. :)

keithcorcoran, beautiful work!

undead_october, yes the latex paint soaked towel, web or cloth sticks really well to whatever you're corpsing. And added advantage is if you've don't squeegie too much paint off the item, when you apply it, you can still move the item around a little to reposition it. I've found that you can also do larger pieces, which seems to be a real time saver. I can't imagine having to unroll one cotton ball...much less 20+. That takes a real artist! With this technique you can use a half papertowel or a handful of spider webbing...dip it, squeegie it with your fingers, bunch it up to form whatever shape you want & apply. You don't even have to cover it with anymore paint if you don't want to, there's enough there to do the job. Oh, did I mention that this is messy? It's like playing paddy-cake with a mudpuddle. LOL

KeithCorcoran mentioned one thing that may be the down side. Lack of flexibility. Pure paint & paper towels won't flex much, so they'll tear if an unsecured joint is pushed too far. Maybe spider webs would probably hold up better there, but there's still not that rubbery feel that you get with pure latex.

I'll try to post some pics when I figure out how to.
 

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the teeth are real easy.. just take an impression of your teeth in non-toxic clay like playdoh.. then fire up the hot glue gun and fill your mold with hot glue.. set it aside a while and bam.. .you got life-sized teeth.. paint'em up and stick 'em in.
Great idea!
 

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Thanks Fearington House..

Hello keithcorcoran.. Nice work on those items.. I also am a big fan of snot rag mache.. Both these items were made with that method.

Rob


 

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Thanks Undead.....now I'm putting yet ANOTHER project on my 2012 list! :p
 
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