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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I blew the internal fuse last year and I cannot find it. It says on their site that it is a 7amp 250v fuse. Will a 7amp 125v fuse work? Does fast acting or slow acting make a huge difference? Thanks in advance

Update: Oh no! I am blowing fuses unless I unhook the pump wires. Does anyone know if I should have a steady 120 volts on the pump wires even when I hit the button? I am thinking the board is bad.
 

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as a general rule, you can use a fuse rated for a higher voltage but not a lower. however, a slow acting rated at 125v would be very close to a fast acting at 250v. The difference between fast and slow is pretty minimal and is generally irrelevant.

so a 7A 125v slow acting would be ok but would still pop earlier than a 7A 250v fast acting.
 

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Cool thanks! I bought some 7amp 125volt and 6.3amp 250volt so I am going to give these a shot. Thats all Radio Shack had:(
 

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Oh no! I am blowing fuses unless I unhook the pump wires. Does anyone know if I should have a steady 120 volts on the pump wires even when I hit the button? I am thinking the board is bad.
 

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Oh no! I am blowing fuses unless I unhook the pump wires. Does anyone know if I should have a steady 120 volts on the pump wires even when I hit the button? I am thinking the board is bad.
I would think you'd only have 120 to the pump only WHEN you hit the button. Did you check continuity across the switch to make sure the problem isn't there?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
When I hit the switch on the back of the unit I can hear the relay click but my voltage doesn't change. I wish I had a schematic for the machine. I am thinking something is shorted out.
 

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Oh no! I am blowing fuses unless I unhook the pump wires. Does anyone know if I should have a steady 120 volts on the pump wires even when I hit the button? I am thinking the board is bad.
Sounds like the short is in the winding for the pump magnet. It *could* be the board, and you can check the traces to see if anything looks burned or if a solder whisker or other debris is the problem. But my money is on the magnet wire in the pump - if the insulation gets burned off in the windings it'll short out the coil.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have continuity between both connections of the pump which I figured was normal. Does anyone know what the resistance should be. The board has a couple of relays on it and I am wondering if one is fried. I am going to take it apart when I get a sec.
 

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This is interesting. I hope I'm not thread jacking too much here... maybe something I have to add helps you or someone with an issue relevant to both of us. Or heck, helps me.

I have a March 2010 manufacturing date Chauvet 1300 and I'm blowing my internal fuse. (the one on the internal motherboard)

I took the internal fuse out, and while hard to read, it says 2A 250V.

I took apart the pump, cleaned it, reassembled and it blows the fuse every time I hit the manual FOG button on the back of the unit. Disconnect pump, hit button, no result beyond loud clicking sound coming from main board.

I cleaned the pump based on some google research of a symptom I was experiencing... very low fog output. Yeah... I used someone else's fog juice and I'm betting it was old/recycled/dirty.

THE BIG MISTAKE?
To compound the issue, I was trying to get it to work in the middle of a neighborhood halloween party so I did the following. (don't judge too much) I took the juice tube out, took off the filter and blew into it. It would produce fog. My misguided goal was to see if fluid was freely getting to the pump/heater. By itself, the unit was producing very little fog (more than I was by blowing through the tube). The pump was definitely humming. I then let it sit on for a while and I came back 30 minutes later and found hitting the manual fog button seemed to produce a little more fog after the wait. After 2 minutes or so of manually hitting the fog button off and on, I just let it be. I left it on and possibly even on the timer. I imagine I burned the pump out which has shorted it. Oops. I probably monkey'd with it too much and pushed it pass the point of return.

7A vs 2A Fuse?
Seeing that you claim the fuse on your internal board is 7A got me to thinking I read my fuse wrong. It was hard to read after all. That might explain why my 2A 250V fuses blow immediately in a gloriously bright display. However, when I remove the fuse from the board, it clearly shows 2A under it on the motherboard.


There is also the chance that I reassembled my pump incorrectly or reattached the power wires incorrectly. However, there really isn't much to keep track of and I triple checked. Otaku is probably onto something for me in regards to the pump winding wire being shorted. If that is the case, I'm guessing buying a new unit is probably easier/cheaper than sending it into Chauvet as I'm guessing they won't send me a new pump.

Its a pity. My 1300 has worked for 2 or 3 years now with very light use... I'd hate to throw it on the scrap pile for parts.

Side note: I never cleaned it before or after storage.

UPDATE
This is my pump! It appears that I may have an option if Chauvet doesn't sell it direct to customers.
http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Dc-micro-water-pump-motor-solenoid-valve-electromagnetic-pump-47dsb-ac220v-56w/789547446.html

UPDATE 2
Called Chauvet and they are shipping me a replacement pump for $52 or $56 with free ground shipping. (I can't remember the exact price.) Yes, a bit more than the Aliexpress.com site... but the pump is being shipping and supported by a US company for only about $10 more. The tech was very nice except he made it sound like the 220-240V labeled pump on Aliexpress probably wouldn't work due to the voltage not showing 120V. I argued that the Tech Table on the page made it seem it would just operate differently under different input voltages... but I didn't press much since I was happy with ordering through them. He was very knowledgeable overall and gave me some suggestions on testing my pump for continuity with a multimeter as Keely_A suggested.
 

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Hey dqderrick
I also have a Chauvet Hurricane 1300 manufactured in March 2010.
Mine failed to work this year. I let it run for 30 minutes or so, hoping it was just clogged and the internal heat would loosen up clog particles. It made a bunch of clicking sounds every 45 seconds or so. Then the internal 2Amp fuse blew. I took the chassis off and noticed a circuit board. I replaced the fuse on the circuit board and after warming up, pressed the manual fog button and the fuse blew immediately.

Something is definitely wrong. I have never taken it apart, other than the chassis to access the internal fuse. I'd like to fix, but not sure where to start.
Any suggestions?
Does anyone have step by step DIY instructions (with pictures) for fixing this?
Thanks in advance!
 

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as a general rule, you can use a fuse rated for a higher voltage but not a lower.
Fuses protect the expensive components by blowing before they can be damaged. If you use a fuse rated at a higher voltage, won't that potentially allow damaging current thru the expensive circuitry?

I called Chavet customer service once a couple years ago, and got someone who was helpful. You might try calling them this week. They've "seen it all" and might be able to save you some time and effort. I hope.
 

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Fuses protect the expensive components by blowing before they can be damaged. If you use a fuse rated at a higher voltage, won't that potentially allow damaging current thru the expensive circuitry?

I called Chavet customer service once a couple years ago, and got someone who was helpful. You might try calling them this week. They've "seen it all" and might be able to save you some time and effort. I hope.
no, voltage and current are completely different things but somewhat related.

Try the garden hose analogy, the voltage is the diameter of the hose the amperage is how high the water pressure is or current. so... if you have a slightly larger hose with the same flow going through it.... you get the same output, very close anyway.

no i dont mean a garden hose vs a fire hose ;P like i said its a general rule. the difference between 125v and 250v isnt much in reality, but 125v vs 10,000v is obviously vastly different.
 

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A fuse is there to protect the circuit. The circuit that the manual button, continuous button, and the timer, control is the pump circuit. A 2 amp fuse in a 110 AC circuit can handle over 200 watts. Watts = Voltage X Amps/Current. The pump is likely less than 100 watts in it's normal draw. So if a 2 amp fuse is blowing, then something is wrong with the circuit , and putting a higher amperage fuse is not likely to do anything other than cook the circuit even more.

The proper procedure to investigate this is to OHM the pump. It should offer approximnately 100 ohms. This would mean that the circuit would be designed to pass 1 amp on a continuous basis. A two amp fuse would offer enough protection to allow for surges without blowing.

My guess is the pump was fluid locked and was trying to pump fluid and got so hot, it burned off the insulation on the coil wire. Once that happens the coil is nothing more than a straight piece of wire and checking it with a volt / ohm meter will provide the proof. If the coil is shorted, it will show very little resistance. Less than an OHM I am betting.
 

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To everyone on this board that is talking about changing fuses and putting higher amp fuses in foggers !!

Stop !!! As a trained technician with over 30 years working on electromechanical equipment that ranges from huge insertion machines that run on 240 Volt and pull 30 amps or more, to small equipment that pulls much less current than a fogger I can tell you that fuses in circuits are there for a reason and they are the rated amperage for a reason. Unless you are a certified techincian or electrician, advising on AC circuits that can kill is not wise. When I offer advise I always prequalify the knowledge and awarenes of the dangers of dealing with AC circuits. In most cases the DC stuff we work on can not harm. But foggers pull some major amperage that is very dangerous if you do not know what you are doing.

The problem described here is the pump circuit. It is a solid state relay controlled circuit. That clicking you hear when the pump is disconnected is the solid state relay closing the contacts to supply the 110 AC to the pump. The fuse that blows is on the pump side of the circuit. The pump as far as resistance should show around 100 OHMS. FYI the wattage rating on the fogger includes not only the wattage of the heater, but the wattage of the pump. Thus this fogger is likely drawing around 1200 to 1300 watts total.

As far as using a pump that is rated 220 / 240 ? Nope will not work. It will pump, but at half the level you need. As far as testing the pump? Nothing special here. Just hook up a volt/ohm meter set to range mid range for resistance and you may need to reverse the leads to get a reading. This is because this pump has a diode embedded in that red section where the leads attach. The diode only allows current flow in one direction. The OHMS as stated earlier should be around 100. If it is nothing or very low the pump is toast. If it is open then check the connections to the body of the pump. If you have continuity, then you have a direct short to ground. In either case the fuse will blow.
 

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untillater,

What is your training please. Current flow is based on voltage and resistance. Do yourself a favor and look up OHM's law.

A fuse that is rated for a higher voltage than the circuit it is installed in will allow a higer current flow than it's rating. Here is an example.

120 volt 100 OHM resistance = 1.2 amps and 144 watts
240 volt 100 OHM resistance = 2.4 amps and 288 watts.

So a fuse that is rated for 2 amps on a 240 volt circuit will allow 4 amps to flow on a 120 volt circuit. So you are very much wrong when you claim about you are not talking about higher amps. If you increase the voltage rating or the amperage rating on a fuse you are providing and increase in possible current flow to the circuit. A fuse that is rated 125 Volt 4 amps is the exact same fuse as a fuse rated 250 volts 2 amps.

This is simple OHMS law. Like I said. People who offer advice on stuff they do not clearly undestand can lead others into dangerous situations.

Next !!
 

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my training is a BS degree in computer science with minor in electrical engineering.

yes you are right about ohms law. However trying to apply it to a fuse is plain folly. Fuses have a wide range of tolerance (talking about consumer electronics grade). They can pop as low as the exact rating or lower, or even as much as 10 times the rated current. Go look at manufacturer spec sheets.

A simple google search for "fuse voltage rating importance" will pull up dozens of results saying exactly what I am saying. The general rule is that a higher voltage rating (within reason) will not have any adverse effect.

edit: BTW, there is almost 0 resistance to a fuse.
 

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Tell me. The circuit that is failing is the pump circuit. Just one component is on the fuse side of that circuit. The Pump. So exactly what could change that putting a higher rated fuse in the circuit would fix the problem?

Lets just see how much you really know about circuits shall we?
 

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Spin, I make it a point not to open my mouth when I do not know what I am talking about.

I did not offer any advice beyond the fuse as I have not opened one to even know what components are inside. I have not looked at a schematic, nor datasheets for any part of the circuit. I do have a couple 1300 foggers, but like I already said, never opened one.

I also did not argue with the rest of your troubleshooting as I have not done it on a fogger. The only foggers I have had die on me are the cheapy walmart special ones, which i just throw away when they die.

Quit trying to make this into a personal battle, help where you can, and learn when you are taught. I will do the same.
 
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