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Hi gang -
I want to try my hand at building my first cemetery fence this year, using the popular PVC pipe and furring strip method. My question: how does one secure the pipe (vertical) lengths to the furring strips (horizontal)? Is there a "sweet spot" to put a screw through each join to keep it in place? Should I just glue everything? What trouble can I anticipate in trying to attach two different types of media (wood & plastic) together?
I did a quick search in this folder but didn't see my answer offhand - sorry if it has been discussed before, and thanks in advance, as always!!
 

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I know you might have your heart set on PVC Pipe Fencing, but have you ever tried page wire. Cheap and easy to install and store. I bought 6 eight foot sections of Page wire from Home depot it's the stuff they use in concrete driveways, anyways I painted it up a nice grey then tied the sections together with small wire tie's which you can't see then bought some women's triangular makeup pad remover sponges painted them grey also then stuck them on each wire across the top then placed the bottom into the grass. all done. nice thing about this is you can expand or contract the area you want without too much trouble and it's flexible and can give you rounded corners if you like. I had looked a PVC sections and this alternative gave me better security from kid's hands and I drape all kinds of webs and trinkets from this fence. Well good luck whatever you decide.
Blood
 

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Wolfman,
I think you have to decide how you are going to store the fence when not in use. I have friends who simply drilled a hole in the pvc and place a small screw or peg into the hole so the pvc won't drop threw the furring strip holes. That way you can pull them out when you are done with them. At each corner or joint section they put the pvc threw one end set of holes then one first set of whole on the next section. That way they can pivit the two section any way they want. However you need to have the first and last pvc pipes long enought to enter the ground or use some rod iron stakes to help stabelize the section. Then I have some friends who just use a screw into the furring and pvc via a pre drilled hole. These two way you can dissasemble the fence and store. However I do have another friend who glues and screws his sections together and then uses longer screws to join the sections threw predrilled holes. But he has to store the fence sections as its own whole piece. He then ties them together with tye wire and hangs then in his store room. which isn't too bad if you have the room. He also has some collum type end corner that are painted to look like brinks so he can put statues on them or what ever. he attached the fence to them with Angel clips which he put a screw into the fence section and then into the wood collums. To be honest you don't notice the screws once you have the entire fence put up.
 

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If you're going to build the traditional 1/2" pvc conduit and 1x3 firring strip fence, the common practice is to drill a counter-sink hole (there's a bit for this available at any home improvement store) and then run a 1" drywall screw through the hole into the plastic conduit. The counter-sink hole prevents the thin wood from splitting. No need for glue.

Some pointers and general directions:
Choose the straightest strips you can find.
Lay out the strips on a flat surface (I used the garage floor), and mark ALL of them with a line at every spot where a post is to go. i.e., get the strips all evened up at one end, move in 4", draw a line across all the strips with a straight edge. Move over 8", do it again. Move over 8", do it again, etc... until you get to the end of the strips.
Attach pairs of strips together, one on top of each other. I ran a screw through them at either end and in the middle. Drill the holes for the conduit at every marked spot through the wide side of the strips.
Drill the counter-sink holes into the thin edge of the strips, trying to get them centered into each hole for the conduit.
Mark each strip on the end with an awl or scribe deeply with a pencil. You're marking each pair uniquely. I creatively used "1", "2", "3", etc...
remove the screws holding each pair of strips together.
Paint the strips before assembly (this allows you to paint inside the holes).
Remember that there's a wide joint on one end of every piece of conduit. When you divide up the conduit, remember to subtract the length of the joint from the total usable length of the piece.
Set up a stop on your table or chop saw to make sure that every pvc piece is the same length. Cut all the pieces.
Paint the pvc. I don't think there's a way to get a great finish that isn't time consuming. I laid mine out and painted them en-mass, rotated them, and then painted them again, repeating until they were uniformally covered.
Make a jig using a piece of scrap plywood or some 2x4's, or both. The jig allows you to line up the conduit at the bottom so it's all even, and sets the position of the bottom and top rungs at a particular spot. Without a jig, you're going to spend an extra 20 minutes on each section because you'll have to measure each piece before assembly.
Assemble the strips and conduit, doing one strip at a time.
Do any paint touch up.
Put on your toppers, whether they're light up skulls, skull whistles, or fancy fleur-de-lis.
Admire.

Craig
 

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Hey guys. I made a simple fence system back in 05 I still use today. I took that fake barbed wire you find online or walmart. Can't remember the lengths they came in. Screwed them into 1/2 inch pvc painted black. Did three rolls on each. Topped each pvc pipe with small plastic skull. Used 2'-21/2' rebarbed(found already cut at Home Depot) pound in the ground leaving about a foot up top. Slid my pvc pipe unto them and there it is. Storage is easy just lay it down lenghtwise and roll up into a nice bundle. Set up just as easy roll out set up onto your rebar.
 

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Remember that there's a wide joint on one end of every piece of conduit. When you divide up the conduit, remember to subtract the length of the joint from the total usable length of the piece.
Make a jig using a piece of scrap plywood or some 2x4's, or both. The jig allows you to line up the conduit at the bottom so it's all even, and sets the position of the bottom and top rungs at a particular spot. Without a jig, you're going to spend an extra 20 minutes on each section because you'll have to measure each piece before assembly. END OF QUOTE


First off CraigInPA you gave some great tips 1)lay out all the strips and mark them at the same time 2)Screw two strips together so the holes line up. But I did get a little lost on the two items above 1) You are using PVC plumbing pipe not electrical conduit I didn't know one end of the pipe was wider than the rest of the pipe how much do you cut off?
2) Not sure what a jig is, and how it is used I know you explained it I just can't picture it help?
Thanks again for the tips.
 

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Blaberus craniifer
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When I built my fence, I cut shallow ring grooves in the PVC on my table saw (set the blade height about 1/32" high and rotated the PVC over the blade). I then put a bead of gorilla glue in the groove and slid it into place in the wood furring strips. Haven't had any splitting and the fence sections are still solid.
 

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Bête noire
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I used this fence from Home Depot. It's sold in 20' rolls. The price varies during the year, so watch for a sale. I didn't have time to paint it black last year, but that's on this years list. Just roll it up when the night's over. It comes in 24" and 36" heights.


 

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Plumbing PVC is the same diameter at both ends, and is usually white in color. The conduit referred to is usually gray, and has one end flared to receive the other end of next pipe. I used the white PVC.
The rollup fence material idea is a new one to me. Looks like a good alternative if you dont want to make your own. Stores easier too.

My fence is in 8' sections joined by plumbers tape (thin metal with holes in it).
It folds up.

I think the PVC is a little more wrought iron looking than the roll up wood pickett.
Pete
 

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livin Halloween every day
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My fence is all pvc and is made in sections for easy storage on the back garage wall. The fence is very sturdy. I pound 1" thinwall pvc into the ground at each section end and the 3/4" pvc slips right into the thinwall in the ground. It is very sturdy and quick and easy to put up and take down.
 

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Technological Terror
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Remember that there's a wide joint on one end of every piece of conduit. When you divide up the conduit, remember to subtract the length of the joint from the total usable length of the piece.
Make a jig using a piece of scrap plywood or some 2x4's, or both. The jig allows you to line up the conduit at the bottom so it's all even, and sets the position of the bottom and top rungs at a particular spot. Without a jig, you're going to spend an extra 20 minutes on each section because you'll have to measure each piece before assembly. END OF QUOTE


First off CraigInPA you gave some great tips 1)lay out all the strips and mark them at the same time 2)Screw two strips together so the holes line up. But I did get a little lost on the two items above 1) You are using PVC plumbing pipe not electrical conduit I didn't know one end of the pipe was wider than the rest of the pipe how much do you cut off?
2) Not sure what a jig is, and how it is used I know you explained it I just can't picture it help?
Thanks again for the tips.
Maybe I can clearify this for you...

PVC can come in lengths that have the coupler on one end of the pipe so that it may be attached to another piece the same diameter. If you ask at your local hardware store for Schedule 40 PVC, it will be much thicker and usually does not have the larger coupler on one of its end. Usually the 12ft lengths will not have the larger coupler.

Next, a jig is simply a form carpenters will make that allows them to perfectly make cuts or line up pieces of wood without having to re-measure or square up each time. Jigs are very helpful to make when you have something like this cemetery fence project, as you do a lot of cutting, screwing, and lining things up the same way over and over. I made a jig out of a scrap piece of 2x4 for my cemetery fence. It was basically a long piece with two smaller pieces attached at each end making a weird U shape with low sides. It allowed me to place the furring strips on the top of each side of the 2x4 U jig and screw in each piece of PVC the exact same length from top and bottom by siding them in all at once them screwing them all in as they met up with the bottom of the U shape jig. Made it a lot easier and faster, no measuring.
 

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http://www.halloweenforum.com/picture.php?albumid=1994&pictureid=39489
Here is my fence its pvc with 1*2 wood strips with gardning fence at the top then at ever 8' section i put a 1 1/2 pvc pipe with cap with skull glued to topif my pic dosnt show up check 2010 haunt in my pics i drilled holes through the pvc then put wood screws through each section thaat wood and pvc meet exept bottom on like 2 pvc sections on each 8' section to slide over top of rebar driven in the ground it turned out pretty good i think oh yeah the collums are made compleatly out of foam
 

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Jig

Remember that there's a wide joint on one end of every piece of conduit. When you divide up the conduit, remember to subtract the length of the joint from the total usable length of the piece.
Make a jig using a piece of scrap plywood or some 2x4's, or both. The jig allows you to line up the conduit at the bottom so it's all even, and sets the position of the bottom and top rungs at a particular spot. Without a jig, you're going to spend an extra 20 minutes on each section because you'll have to measure each piece before assembly. END OF QUOTE


First off CraigInPA you gave some great tips 1)lay out all the strips and mark them at the same time 2)Screw two strips together so the holes line up. But I did get a little lost on the two items above 1) You are using PVC plumbing pipe not electrical conduit I didn't know one end of the pipe was wider than the rest of the pipe how much do you cut off?
2) Not sure what a jig is, and how it is used I know you explained it I just can't picture it help?
Thanks again for the tips.
A jig is simply a piece of wood or metal that is held at a certain point ( called a stop)on a table so you can push your wood up to it and the saw will cut the same lenght everytime. This is done with power tools but not with hand tools, With hand tools simply mark the lenght with a measuring tape and cut with hand saw, jig saw, circular saw etc. Your correct the electrical conduit does have a bell end, i used that to hold a finial on both ends, its about four inches long. Hope I helped
 

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I know you might have your heart set on PVC Pipe Fencing, but have you ever tried page wire. Cheap and easy to install and store. I bought 6 eight foot sections of Page wire from Home depot it's the stuff they use in concrete driveways, anyways I painted it up a nice grey then tied the sections together with small wire tie's which you can't see then bought some women's triangular makeup pad remover sponges painted them grey also then stuck them on each wire across the top then placed the bottom into the grass. all done. nice thing about this is you can expand or contract the area you want without too much trouble and it's flexible and can give you rounded corners if you like. I had looked a PVC sections and this alternative gave me better security from kid's hands and I drape all kinds of webs and trinkets from this fence. Well good luck whatever you decide.
Blood
Blood -This is a roll material thats got 4 or 6 inch square openings? Is it made of wire or fibergalss? How do you keep it upright?
Thanks for helping me
 

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My fence is all pvc and is made in sections for easy storage on the back garage wall. The fence is very sturdy. I pound 1" thinwall pvc into the ground at each section end and the 3/4" pvc slips right into the thinwall in the ground. It is very sturdy and quick and easy to put up and take down.
Your yard must not have any rocks, I use rebar because I have to break through the rock. I made a flower bed in the middle of my yard as I started to dig, I soon found out that my yard is rock with a little dirt mixed in.
 

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Let me clarify that I use plastic electrical conduit, not schedule 40 plumbing pipe. The plastic electrical conduit is grey, and UV stabilized, so it's usable outdoors even if you don't paint it. Schedule 40 isn't, and will turn yellow with age, unless it's painted. Conduit has a "bell end" to accept another piece the same size, without the need of an extra connector. When you measure the usable length of your piece of conduit, you have to subtract the length of the bell end.

My assembly jig for the fence was a sheet of 4x8 piece of plywood, another scrap of plywood about 2'x4', a 10' length of 2x4, and 2 10' lengths of 2x3. I screwed one of the 2x4's at a right angle to the bottom edge of the plywood, giving me a 3 1/2" tall (or thereabouts) "curb" or "stop". A 2x3 was screwed about 9" away and parallel to it in a similar manner. The second 2x3 was screwed (length of conduit - 6") away from the 2x4, parallel to both in a similar manner.

To use the jig, I loosely slipped the conduit into the horizontal stringers top and bottom, and then placed the whole 10' length into the jig with the stringer below and touching the 9" away 2x3 piece. The conduit will rest on the 2x3's evenly. By pushing the ends of the conduit down to the 2x4, I've just aligned all the pieces. I now screw every piece of conduit through the counter-sunk holes. When I'm done with the bottom, I move up to the top, and repeat the screwing procedure. When done, just lift the completed fence out of the jig and move to the next one.

I think it took less than 10 minutes to make the jig, and I know I saved a LOT of time using it by not having to measure anything during assembly.

One additional set-up trick-keep the fence sections from wandering and creating unsightly gaps by using "mending plates" available in the hardware department to hold the ends together. I use the 3" or 4" lengths, painting them to match the fence.

One storage trick, too:
Wire tie pairs of fence sections together to make them easier to move, and hang them on the wall with shelf brackets. I store 100' of fence (10 10' sections) as 5 pairs, with 3 pairs on the ground against the garage side wall, and 2 pairs on a pair of 8" metal shelf brackets above them. A piece of string and a nail keep the ones on the ground tight against the wall. Total space taken up: 9" wide x 10' long x just under 8' tall.

Craig
 

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I really liked the old, rusty wrought iron look, so this is what I built. 12 eight foot sections, totaling 96 feet (48 on either side of the entrance). I also built gates for the entrance using the same method (although the top rail was a bit of a challenge). The original finials are 1/8" masonite glued into grooves in the pvc. I bought new plastic finials from King Architectural which will greatly improve the look!!! The posts in between each section are 1 1/2" PVC with small foam skulls from Michaels glued to a cap on top.

make them scream, I really like your paint job, the use of the little plastic gardan fence, and the double bottom rail on your fence.




 
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