Halloween Forum banner

21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Sorry no pics but it is simple. Round cardboard base, chicken wire type material as a base with foam blocks underneath for support to give it some height. About 250 red and orange LED string lights on top of the wire. Laid sticks on that wire and put a modest layer of Great Stuff on and around that.

Finally used black, chalky grey and red spray paint (not too much) for some character during the day time. Grey actually really help make some of the exposed wood look ashy.

Finally, I may copy another haunter here, forgot the name, and spray a but of black rubber coating on this and cover that with real ash... haven't done that yet.
Nice work, especially so fast. Don't forget that sunlight can deteriorate Great Stuff if it is not thoroughly painted. I couldn't tell for sure if the Great Stuff on your prop was covered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Nice work, especially so fast. Don't forget that sunlight can deteriorate Great Stuff if it is not thoroughly painted. I couldn't tell for sure if the Great Stuff on your prop was covered.
Thanks and yes, vast majority of it is painted but I may also spray it with some sealer or something as well. Appreciate the heads up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
[The hole] in the middle will allow me to pipe some fog up into the cauldron, where it will be chilled before spilling over the edge.
Just a suggestion: don't go to the trouble of chilling your fog. Fog rolls across the ground, but smoke does not. If you chill the fog juice, it will look like fog rolling out of your fire-pit, not smoke rising up from the coals. Smoke doesn't spill over; it rises. Save your chiller for laying down fog if you choose to, but if you're doing smoke, just let that fogger do it's thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
Just a suggestion: don't go to the trouble of chilling your fog. Fog rolls across the ground, but smoke does not. If you chill the fog juice, it will look like fog rolling out of your fire-pit, not smoke rising up from the coals. Smoke doesn't spill over; it rises. Save your chiller for laying down fog if you choose to, but if you're doing smoke, just let that fogger do it's thing.
Fair point, I will see how that works before going to the trouble of chilling. Thx.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
Round cardboard base, chicken wire type material as a base with foam blocks underneath for support to give it some height. About 250 red and orange LED string lights on top of the wire. Laid sticks on that wire and put a modest layer of Great Stuff on and around that.
As an aside to those who might follow your lead to creating a great looking fire-pit, I would make a suggestion about the base. Cardboard will work as long as your prop is indoors, but even there, it's cardboard, and that can get a bit flimsy over time. For anyone thinking to make their fire-pit a bit more weatherproof or even a bit more sturdy, I would suggest using either plywood or coroplast. Coroplast is that corrugated plastic that looks a great deal like cardboard, but is waterproof and stronger. And unlike plywood, you don't even have to paint it to keep it out in the elements. By adding a stronger, more weather resistant base, you give yourself a prop that is flexible in and out of doors.

We used Coroplast salvaged from political signs to make the base for our cauldron creep's fire and it's not only stood up to the elements, it's stood up to me toting it about and staking it to the ground year after year. The glowing embers might be getting an upgrade this year with the addition of a couple of flame lights slipped into the plastic bottles used as logs in the fire. Right now, it's just a string of 100 orange incandescent mini-lights that have ten flickering bulbs as a part of the set.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
As an aside to those who might follow your lead to creating a great looking fire-pit, I would make a suggestion about the base. Cardboard will work as long as your prop is indoors, but even there, it's cardboard, and that can get a bit flimsy over time. For anyone thinking to make their fire-pit a bit more weatherproof or even a bit more sturdy, I would suggest using either plywood or coroplast. Coroplast is that corrugated plastic that looks a great deal like cardboard, but is waterproof and stronger. And unlike plywood, you don't even have to paint it to keep it out in the elements. By adding a stronger, more weather resistant base, you give yourself a prop that is flexible in and out of doors.

We used Coroplast salvaged from political signs to make the base for our cauldron creep's fire and it's not only stood up to the elements, it's stood up to me toting it about and staking it to the ground year after year. The glowing embers might be getting an upgrade this year with the addition of a couple of flame lights slipped into the plastic bottles used as logs in the fire. Right now, it's just a string of 100 orange incandescent mini-lights that have ten flickering bulbs as a part of the set.

Yes, excellent point Chubb. I set mine outside yesterday and of course it rained here last night (for the third time in about 4 months). I am already assuming I should upgrade that base to something else...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
Yes, excellent point Chubb. I set mine outside yesterday and of course it rained here last night (for the third time in about 4 months). I am already assuming I should upgrade that base to something else...
I took a look at the old build of our cauldron creep and realized it's wasn't made with the political signs we use for just about everything else, but a piece of clear Coroplast that gets used in making greenhouses. We got it from someone who was tearing down a greenhouse, so it met our price point. :) Lowe's sells a 2'x3' section of the stuff for $10.48. As you can see, we didn't cut it out as a round shape. We use the square edges to stake it to the ground with nail-style tent stakes with their caps removed and a washer added. They're very easy to set into the ground, easy to cover up with a bit of bark dust or whatever you have available, and they have held tight through some very rough storms.

722077


We like your design using real wood and leaving a center hole for a fog machine. We're going to copy it when making our witches fire-pit. But it's going to have plastic on the base when it's made. We live in Oregon. It rains way more than three times every four months. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Just curious if the lights are accessible at all after making these? Like if a bulb burns out or you want to change some bulbs to a different color? Looks fantastic either way. Great job!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
Just curious if the lights are accessible at all after making these? Like if a bulb burns out or you want to change some bulbs to a different color? Looks fantastic either way. Great job!
Bulbs embedded in the Great Stuff, so unlikely to come out. But these are LED strings so they should last a long time, and, should work if a bulb goes out.

Thanks for the compliments. Very happy with this after seeing it with fog streaming out.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top