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Discussion Starter #1
I'm working on a candelabra for this up coming Halloween. Here's the first stage of it,



I have 5 120V AC electric candles from JoAnn fabrics. I don't want 5 plugs to plug into an outlet. So my question is, does anyone know how to take all 5 of these cords and put them into one plug, safely?
 

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just splice them together.

I use solder and heat shrink, but wire nuts and electrical tape works as well.

cut the wires and seperate them into hot and neutral groups. there is usally a stripe or ribbed wire in each pair, these are one group, the other group is the without.
 

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Yeah, Follow Bradbaum's suggestion. I used wire nuts for a similar situation and was quick & easy. If you go with wire nuts just look for ones that are big enough since it would have 5 wires plus the wire going to the outlet.
 

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How many watts are the bulbs?

As long as (Bulb Watts*qty)/Volts= <15 Amps, then there should not be a problem.

Do make certain any wire you may add after the 5 pairs are combined and your plug meet the needs of the combined Amp draw.
 

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I think you would be ok, these look like small individual candles, and each should only draw very small amounts . One thing to think about though is once you wire it up how are you going to hide the wires? My suggestion is to either paint them a flat black before hand and wrap them tightly to the stem or run them all down one side and wrap tightly in a flat black tape. Another suggestion is to disasemble a battery powered tea light and mount the internals inside each candle, that way you have NO wires and NO problems hiding the wires.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah, I'm planning on getting plaster and dripping it down each candle for that awesome look. When I'm done I'll post. Here's a pic of the wires wrapped around the middle bar of the candelabra.
 

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You should be fine wiring them into one plug. What i would do is join them in a small junction or project box then attach the cord at the junction. If you put them all into on plug it will be hard to make repairs later.
 

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Here we go. So I just went with the easiest thing. A nice trip to the scary side of town and guys a radio shack that had no idea what a junction box was.....

I just put a Wire Connector (Wire Nut?) with all the cords, negative and minus seperate, together and now it's workin awesome!! I replaced those lame Christmas bulbs with the flickering flame bulbs! Look!

So, now it's burning fine, no melting or smoke or fires, yet, lol. Painting and then the wax! more to come!
 

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That is looking really good!

BTW, wire nut is correct. Radio Shack does not have junction boxes AFAIK, but they should have had a couple sizes of project boxes. If you are near a Fry's electronics they should have an even better selection of project boxes than Radio Shack. Home Depot or Lowe's should have junction boxes, but for your application I think a small project box would be the better option just because you can get them much smaller than junction boxes.
 

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I would of connected the wires up near the top ran one wire down the "stand" like a lamp.as far as the junction box if this is to sit on a table I would make a wooden box like something they use to keep writing paper in and set the lamp on top;and drill a hole in the top and use the box to hide the wires. I.E nice looking juction box or project box.A juction box you would get at a lowes,home depot there used to put your connceted wires in they look like an outlet box that's in your walls the plastic one cost about a buck and the metal ones about 1.50.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
here it is all nice and painted up! looks pretty awesome to me! now it's time for the wax!


I'm going to be using plaster of paris for this part, any recomendations? Just mix and drip on?
 

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Thanks for your guys' concerns about the electrical. I actually plan on going to good will or some old antique place to pick a few old books to convert into something candelabra can sit on and store the wires, wrapped in e-tape, inside. So I tried the plaster technique for the wax. It started off really nice, dripping down the sides, but it was too wet to try and get to drip off the sides. As the plaster hardened, of course, it just started looking more like a rock.... So I pulled it all off and am back to wax. I'd love to use it, but storing it is tough and wax breaks real easily. Any ideas on what I can use instead of wax and plaster, or is there an easier plaster technique for a dripping wax technique?
 

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Mill Creek Haunted Hollow
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Mr.PG, you might just try a hot glue gun. If you get the temp right, you can make pretty good drips of the glue. When it cools, it's pretty good looking wax. If you don't like the milky finish, you can paint over it with a latex paint.
 

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For that matter, you might just skip the hot glue step and get a hair dryer and a good drip of latex paint.

I would try a good latex paint and dip a metal coat hanger into it. Then run the coat hanger up the side of the candle while running the hair dryer. You might take three or four passes to get the nice, thick drops of wax you're looking for, but the hair dryer should help to speed-dry the exterior of the drop(s) of paint -- holding them in place and helping to hold their shape.
 

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Yeah, hot glue would be the way to go. When you are all done, you can spray paint the glue with satin finish ivory paint and it looks just like wax. Here's a picture of PVC candles using hot glue and the spray paint:



To get that perfect dripped look:



Firsly, I built up the top of mine with strips of glue to make a wall of wax to have the flicker candle reflect off of. For yours, I don't think you have enough room for that. The next step is to start from the outside of the top and zig-zag large swaths of glue being sure they butt up as you go down. The combination of the still hot glue and gravity will connect it to give it a nice covering look. As you reach the bottom, add large glops of glue and that will give you a bulbous drip at the bottom.





Add a second layer to cover the gaps left by the first layer.






Keep adding drippings until you like the look.
 
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