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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have very little experience with prop building, but I have created a newspaper skeleton (SpookyBlue style, but using cans for the sternum instead of a pool noodle).

Alan from StiltBeast Studios uses a widely known technique for corpsing, where you wrap the skelly in plastic, then heat-gun it to shrink it on, forming a rotted-skin-like appearance.

I was wondering if using the heat gun on the newspaper is a bad idea... Basic common sense says yes, but if it is do-able, then I know it would save me alot of time.

What are your guys' experiences with heat-gunning paper? Is it a quick trick or a fiery disaster? :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Will-do, thank's for the tip!
 

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I've used the plastic technique many times before, and would think if your newspaper "frame" is rigid/stiff enough it should work. The technique works by the plastic shrinking from the applied heat. If the plastic is too thick, when it shrinks - it may distort your newspaper since paper doesn't have much rigidity. You'll have to just experiment and try it out! :)
 

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Rutherford Manor Haunt
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I think it will work, just be careful with the heat gun keep it moving! :)

Another concern could be the stain saturating the paper. I have used Allan Hopps technique many times and It takes quite a lot of stain. The newspaper will absorb quite a bit and that may affect the and distort the base structure as well. Who knows it may be one of those happy "mistakes" and make it look even creepier? I would recommend you get it out in the sun as quickly as possible to speed up the drying time on the stain.
 

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Oak Lane Cemetery
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You'd be surprised at what you can plastic corpse as long as you are careful. I've gone a bit crazy with it this year. Corpsed a ton of pumpkins, made a spellbook, created an entire stump complete with roots made from corpsed over pool noodles, and constructed the walls of a small 6 x 8 witch hut. All using the plastic and heat gun method. I've found that with materials that are easily damaged like pool noodles and paper it's best to start out on a heat that is just hot enough to soften the plastic and make it shrink, then build up layers to get a protective shell formed before going nuts and making all the wrinkles and holes. Once cooled it should be nice and stiff and will somewhat waterproof the underlying materials as long as you have complete coverage.
 
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