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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Note: This is a repost of an old tutorial whose links to pictures were broken with the software update at HF.

Think it is impossible to find matte black, lightweight, storable, paintable and CHEAP! wall panels for your haunt? Believe. If you use the right kind of landscape fabric anything is possible. Here's how it's done:

Note: This is a 3-part video tutorial series on ChromaDepth 3D wall panels. Please look for the other two tutorials: Designing ChromaDepth 3D Haunt Images and Painting ChromaDepth 3D Haunt Wall Panels.

Please watch this video to get an overview of the tutorial:



The fabric used is pro landscape fabric (DeWitt Weed Barrier Pro). It isn’t like the stuff you see off the shelf at Home Depot. This was sourced at a wholesale nursery. You may already be familiar with what it is made with – polypropylene. It is the same stuff you see reusable shopping bags. I’ve also spotted it in different colors at fabric store to make crafts. Not surprising – it is washable, paintable and durable. Miracle fabric and perfect for haunters and making lightweight haunt panels. The huge 300’X6’ rolls I’ve spotted being sold at Grainger and Amazon.


Close-up of the type of reusable shopping bags that are made of polypropylene.



Here’s a super-duper close-up of the fabric and how it takes paint.



These panels stack up great and don’t take up much room.



Frame out the wall panel using cheap furring strips (two 8' pieces and three 61" pieces). Use a 1/8 drill bit to pre-drill and then drill in 2 1/2" wood screws to hold the frame together.

Place hook-side of Velcro pieces in the corners and three centers. Staple with a staple gun to secure in place. Tie two rope hooks on each side at the top. Attach landscape fabric using the loop side of the Velcro. Using a regular stapler, staple to secure the loop side of the Velcro to the fabric. The glue won't be enough to keep in place. Use the staple gun again to super secure the fabric to the wood frame. You can easily remove the fabric any time by just prying off the staple.

Cut the fabric to the frame at the top and bottom so you won't step on it as you move it...not that I ever did that.....



Diagram of the wall panel layout in the three-car garage I have. Before hanging, place duct tape on the floor where the wall panels are supposed to go to help you line up the panels when you are hanging them. It also helps you test out your floor plan to see if you like it.

Each square on this diagram represents 1 foot.

Here’s another video with more views of how these panels are hung:




In the highlighted area you should be able to see white strings hanging down. Find the studs in the ceiling and put in screw hooks. The strings hang down from that. Now you have something to attach those rope hooks you placed on the wall panels when you built them.

By the way, after Halloween, I leave the strings hanging all year so I don't have to mess with it again. Bonus: it irritates the hubby...



If the studs in the ceiling don't match up where the wall needs to be, simply span a string between the two studs and drop the hanging string where you want it to be.



Not only can you hang the wall panels from the ceiling, you can also hang them on the wall or your open garage door. Also, if you have one panel already hanging from the ceiling, just hook the adjacent panel to the wall panel. You will see that as you assemble the maze, the panels start to reinforce each other and it will get stronger and stronger.



If you split your haunt into half blacklight and the other is not, make an additional fabric panel to span the whole height of the ceiling so it blocks out the light. In the picture you see one side already attached.



Use safety pins to attach the hanging fabric side of the wall panels together. This also helps reinforce the walls and block views to the other side.



Another shot of the safety pins being used. Under blacklight - these don't show.

Note: You will have to make some custom-sized wall panels. In one part of the maze I could only fit a 4' wide panel. In another, I had to make a gateway door frame so I could get back into my house. It takes a bit more figuring out and measuring but it's still pretty easy.



If you made sure that the hooks in the ceiling are in studs you can hang a surprising amount of weight off of the walls. Here you see camo nets across it, jute netting, chains...you name it.



These pictures hopefully give you a sense of the maze you can create using fabric wall panels. (This is in the ChromaDepth 3D section).

Thanks for checking out the tutorial.
 

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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you Terra for coming back and updating your tutorials so the info isn’t lost to the forum. 🥰
My pleasure and it's been fun updating them. It is a little shocking that some of these were 10 years old. Can you believe it was that long ago??? Seems like just a few years.
 

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Thanks for the excellent tutorial. Lots of detailed, clear explanations for how you do it. Can you just use staples instead of velcro to hold the fabric in place or do they pull through? Love the wall paintings, by the way!
 

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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the excellent tutorial. Lots of detailed, clear explanations for how you do it. Can you just use staples instead of velcro to hold the fabric in place or do they pull through? Love the wall paintings, by the way!
Thank you :) I didn't try just using staples but I would think you'd be fine but may not last as many seasons. I did the Velcro thing primarily because I changed out the art each season.
 
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