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Wondering if anyone can help me here...

For our Haunted House this year, we want to build an elevator prop. The way we set it up is that we send the guests into the elevator, and it takes them "down" to catacombs deep underground.

We want some sort of movement to occur in the elevator. We're already going to put large speakers under the floor of the elevator with some deep, low frequency sound to create vibration. But we also want to be able to raise the elevator a couple inches off the ground (less than 6") very slowly until the "end" of the ride. Therefore, as they ride, we have the vibration in the floor and a very slight feeling of actual movement, and when the end of the ride comes the slightly raised elevator will drop back down to the ground, making the entire elevator shake and drop a bit.

Is there any way to do this safely? I would be able to use pneumatics I think, but I am not sure if it would be strong enough to hold the elevator and its passengers without any risk of danger. Yes, it would be only a tad off the ground, but better safe than sorry, right?
 

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Hydrolics would be your best bet. Depending upon how many people are going to be in the elevator


All is done
 

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Future Marine
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The "rumble Choas" effect will really help. why dont you just rent a crain and drop em off your roof? JK. Even if its only a 6 inch drop you should probably build a metal frame. Not as much for safety reasons as the thing just coming apart. So, i guess that is a safety reason. Another way you could lift it up would be with a winch on top. Get an electric tow thing and set up a quick release. It would probably be cheaper then buying all the pnumatics. Another thing you could do is mount this on a "ball" joint. have pnuematic actuators, about 6 inch throw on either side and shake em up a bit. I am assuming you dont intend to make this for this year?

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To simulate moving down, you could put a light in the door that moves up.
You could also place air vents under the floor that could spray up a bit of air.....

you could also have the elevator made out of planks of wood with some scenery scrolling up on the outside that was visible through the wood.....

and maybe, if you have got the resources, gently raise the elevator with hydraulics then quickly release it back to the ground (just don't do it so fast that the guests get hurt).

enough of my rambling.

The world is a scary place ... I aim to make it scarier!
 

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Going bump in the night..
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B O T H - you may be able to acheive this effect without any lifting at all.

Upon a visit to Epcot Center, one of the "attractions" they have is a simulated deep sea adventure, which begins with an "elevator" ride "DOWN" to the submarine level.

The lift descends NOT ONE BIT - but it shakes and vibrates quite a bit.

The most notice-able part of the elevator ride is the jerk at the beginning and the end - in the middle is a constant vibration.
One thing I did notice right away - the floor was not attached to the walls. There was about an 1/8" or 1/16" gap all the way around the floor, where it should have met the wall. Also, the walls did not vibrate as much as the floor. The floor was obviously a platform within stable walls.

A platform on some old truck springs would probably be a good start, which would have the added benefit of not actually needing to be lifted off the ground.

An old compressor motor with an offset weight attached to the drive shaft could provide the constant vibration (just bolt it to the center of the platform).

A pneumatic "kicker" could provide a good thump/jerk to the platform to simulate the lurch a lift makes upon starting and stopping. Someone on this board could probably give a great how-to on what would work (not I - if you want to survive).
 

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I like the lights in a computer sequence to give effect of motion. I was wondering how that could be done w/o actually moving the light. That is a great idea.

I think small pancake air cylinders or cylinders would be best to simulate the movement.

OR

I might be making one of these for next year we'll see.

PB
 

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Nice thing about lifting it from above would be the ability to slowly turn the elevator around while it is occupied so that when the doors open, people will exit the elevator to your "underground" set.
 

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Maybe consider purchasing or even building some tactile transducers. There also known bass shakers and typically used for home theater simulations.
 

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What about the Helevator that Boneyard Bargains does? I can't find the link on their site for the info on what it did anymore. The site is Boneyardbargains (yes...it's the Canadian one, lol).
Here's a link to where they sell the plans plans
I'm not suggesting that you buy them, but you might be able to figure out how to do it on your own from their description, if you can find it.
 

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Got me thinking about another way to have a different scene upon exiting the elevator. Maybe easier than the rotating elevator.

 

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You could also have them exit thru the back door of the elevator like many freight elevators or elevators in hospitals which commonly have 2 doors in the elevator.
 

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I recall reading something along the lines of having customers/guests on a moving surface adds tons of liability and needs to get inspected as if it was a ride? Came across that when was considering having a spinning floor, hopefully someone can elaborate on that or correct me.
 
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