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First I'd like to say for a long time i thought that this stuff couldn't be that much better than the free beaded white foam i was getting from work. I can now say I have been doing it WRONG for a while. This stuff is incredible and god almighty at the mess the beaded board made in comparison to Blue Foam. But that being said and me admitting i was very wrong i have a few questions:

I found 150 Grade Sand Paper works well would anyone suggest a different grade?
Gluing, i would like to glue some things on the tombstones but the liquid nail i used last year went to **** when it rained, so need advice on that
does the hot wire foam cutter work on these?
does any part not covered with paint absorb water?

I know there are some serious foam masters out there id appreciate any help or advice. thanks! :cool:;)
 

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I found the screens used for sanding drywall also work very well. It really does not make much sense to go more than 150 grit since you are not usually looking for a polished finish. I find the foam board glue from Loctite works well. Some of the general contractor glues will eat into your foam so be careful with those. You can cut them with hot wire foam cutters. It does not tend to absorb water.
 
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Gorilla Glue works well to glue adornments on, but it expands as it dries, and that can create problems. There are a lot of options for gluing foam to foam--there are other threads about that. When I have glued things made of plastic, wood, or metal onto foam, which I haven't often done, I usually try to attach something to the back of the item (often with CA glue) and then cut out a recess in the foam to glue it into with a couple drops of Gorilla Glue. If the item already has something that I can stick into the foam or hollow out a recession for, all the better.
 

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Green / Yellow scrub pads work really well on the foam. Especially if you want a broken edge look; just hit the edge in a swiping motion and you'll find it breaks off nicely. This is another tool you won't want to be without. The Stanley-Surform-Shaver As far as glue goes, I use Gorilla Glue and Glidden Gripper. The gripper takes a while to dry, but won't expand like the GG will. Watch Terra's video here on glues Terra's Styro Wars: Styrofoam Glue Tests
Something else to take notice of is that the Blue foam from Lowe's and the Pink from Home Depot are different in thickness. I have found that I have an easier time matching the Pink thickness to off the shelf milled lumber than the Blue. When you come to that part of a project, you'll know what I mean. For that reason, I stay with the pink, otherwise it's the same stuff.
 

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I will 2nd the Terra video. She does a whole video on foam adhesives and found that "Glidden Gripper" works the best for glueing foam together. As for cutting, I use a foam hot knife available at most home improvement stores for about $25 bucks. As well as a wrasp and drywall sanding mesh.
 

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Rutherford Manor Haunt
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I pretty much agree with all above statements, we use 100/120 grit sand paper, or sanding blocks, rasps, Stanley Sureform shaver, Acetone, anything readily available to mark up the surface. We often use Gliddon Gripper for adhering large pieces together, and PL300 for smaller projects, or adornments. We don't typically use GG, but have in the past and it works the draw back is the expansion factor. We use cheap bamboo skewers and weights to hold pieces in place as they can slide around while the glue is setting and mis-aligning the pieces. Also one thing to note the blue and pink styrofoams have a grain, or a preferred direction for carving or scarring. You can go in either direction, but you will notice one is cleaner than the other. We use DryLok, or flat Exterior latex paint for the base colour. These are durable and stand up to sun, wind and cold well. I have never had any issue with it absorbing water, Styrofoam is water resistant. I suppose it would eventually take in water, but it would have to be virtually be immersed.
 
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