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Discussion Starter #1
There was no warning on the package that said it could or would stain your walls.....so I didn't even think about the possibility when I put them in my bathroom on the white wainscoting behind the sink. After a day or 2, I decided I didn't like the look of them (OR the smell) so I pulled them off. To my horror, they left behind a very pink stain that does not wash off. I tried warm water as well as a magic eraser. Nothing worked. So then I decided to paint over them. In fact, I am now on 6 or 7 coats of paint but somehow they keep bleeding through once the paint dries.

Has anyone had this issue? Or does anyone have any suggestions on how to get it off my walls? I can't keep slapping paint over it because now there is too much paint in those areas and the texture is changing from the rest of the wall.

I will NEVER use these horrid things again! :eek:

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Edit: I have no idea why this picture is sideways......it's not on my tablet.....sorry!
 

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Typical Ghoul Next Door
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Those things are awful and should have a warning - I only use them on glass (window/mirror) because the red just seeps right onto anything like walls or doors.

You might try using some Kilz primer and paint over with that first, then repaint with the matching wall paint. The Kiltz should prevent the bleed through from happening.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
A friend of mine at work had recommended Kilz too, so I may give that a try. Have you had any issues putting an acrylic paint on top of an oil based primer? Looks like the Kilz is oil based, and my wall paint is an acrylic. I just did a quick Google search and it seems like it might be ok since it will be indoors.

Also I'm really hoping once it is fully covered and not bleeding thru anymore, the horrible smell these things have goes away. They are very stinky especially in a small powder room....it's a cross between cinnamon (which is probably where the staining comes from, and isn't too bad) and some weird chemical smell. Ugh, I can't un-recommend these enough! LOL
 

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I use them on my front window but never ever on walls. It's like slapping jello on a wall, not good! Sorry this happened to you. I must say though, you describe it almost like your walls are haunted with blood now. It could be more than a stain, it could be paranormal blood ooze. Better watch that! Only windows or glass with these things,
 

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The Haunting Girl
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A friend of mine at work had recommended Kilz too, so I may give that a try. Have you had any issues putting an acrylic paint on top of an oil based primer? Looks like the Kilz is oil based, and my wall paint is an acrylic. I just did a quick Google search and it seems like it might be ok since it will be indoors.
Most oil based primers including Kilz are designed to be top coated with water based latex paints. Just read the label to double check. - that person who worked in the paint department at a major home improvement retailer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I use them on my front window but never ever on walls. It's like slapping jello on a wall, not good! Sorry this happened to you. I must say though, you describe it almost like your walls are haunted with blood now. It could be more than a stain, it could be paranormal blood ooze. Better watch that! Only windows or glass with these things,
Grrrrrrrrreeeeaaaaaaatttttttt.....thanks for planting that seed! :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Most oil based primers including Kilz are designed to be top coated with water based latex paints. Just read the label to double check. - that person who worked in the paint department at a major home improvement retailer.
Haha.....thanks for the tip! That pretty much confirms what I read online :D
 

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There was no warning on the package that said it could or would stain your walls.....so I didn't even think about the possibility when I put them in my bathroom on the white wainscoting behind the sink. After a day or 2, I decided I didn't like the look of them (OR the smell) so I pulled them off. To my horror, they left behind a very pink stain that does not wash off. I tried warm water as well as a magic eraser. Nothing worked. So then I decided to paint over them. In fact, I am now on 6 or 7 coats of paint but somehow they keep bleeding through once the paint dries.

Has anyone had this issue? Or does anyone have any suggestions on how to get it off my walls? I can't keep slapping paint over it because now there is too much paint in those areas and the texture is changing from the rest of the wall.

I will NEVER use these horrid things again! :eek:

View attachment 372482

Edit: I have no idea why this picture is sideways......it's not on my tablet.....sorry!

My son put a pumpkin gel window cling on his slanted ceiling in his bedroom.... looks like a giant water stain now from a 2" pumpkin!!! Horrible!!!
 

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Typical Ghoul Next Door
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Oh goodness! That's disturbing. But if you were going for disturbing then that's awesome. :D

I would suggest anyone dealing with stains on painted surfaces, you'll likely need to use a sealer/primer like Kiltz or Bullseye to cover and seal the stains. These gel clings are likely oil based so they'll just bleed through most paints if you don't seal them first. Unfortunately, this does mean you'll likely have to repaint the whole wall or ceiling to not have the new area stand out, but an old decorator's trick to matching paint in a spot area is to use an old teeshirt to paint with, not a brush. You use the shirt to dab the paint onto the surface, using as light a touch/low amount paint as you can, and let it dry completely and check coverage/blending before adding more.
 
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