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Discussion Starter #1
Disclaimer: In case it's not obvious (it is) I'm a complete newb to prop-building with shamefully little DIY skill.

What tool(s) do you use to cut PVC? I'm going to attempt to make chains and eventually body frames.

What other tools do you use frequently for prop building? I am starting off with tombstones. I've gathered through research here that jigsaws and dremels are must-haves?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Caretaker of Eerie Manor
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They make actual pvc cutting tools. Not cheap but they work well. You can do a nice clean job with a simple hack saw. I've used a chop saw as well.
 

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It really depends on how big the pipe is, how much you are cutting, and how thick. Ratcheting PVC cutters work well for most size pipe. For larger pipe or for doing mulitple or thinner cuts I would use a band saw or sawzall. I have even used a chop saw with a fine tooth blade and it has worked well, but make sure the teeth are fine. I tried a more aggressive blade before and it broke the pipe. Make sure that whatever you use to not get the blade too hot or you will melt the PVC.
 

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I had to cut 28 pieces of pvc pipe for a pirate ship rail. I used a 10" miter saw with a plywood cutting blade, I attached a wooden stop to my fence and started to cut away.

The problem with pvc cutters is that they won't make a straight cut.
 

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I have a shark saw--swear buy it---i don't like anything but i love my shark saw! Be careful with a chop saw--i had a pvc pipe explode on me onece
 

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About $12 gets a big pair of racheting "Scissors" that work So good , no pipes explode no crap flying from small tooth bites. I used to cut pvc for a living.
 

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Just a point of info..

Some guys would install a circular saw blade backwards to cut corregated steel more cleanly. Maybe such a practice could help keep PVC from exploding when using a circular saw? Just a guess.
 

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Keeper of Spider Hill
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I think a few here hit the nail on the head. It really comes down to how much PVC you plan to cut, and the application. The handheld cutters and hacksaws are quick and easy. Great for props like bodies where the pipe is placed into a fitting. Actual size is not as critical nor does it matter if the edge is not perfectly straight.

With the right blade a power miter saw does an awesome job of cutting PVC but if you are cutting a lot of it, the noise can be an issue and the PVC makes your shop look like it snowed. My personal favorite is our horizontal bandsaw. It cuts quickly, is very quiet, and it is also very safe as it spins fairly slow. I built an adjustable workstop that allows me to make repeat cuts up to 4 feet long. It will also cut up to a 45 degree angle. :)

I have this saw too. It is great for cutting wood and PVC, lets you cut accurate angles and gives you a very nice straight cut. I would highly recommend it. For the money it is a very flexible tool. You can even clamp or scew the miter box to your bench.

http://www.toolbarn.com/jorgensen-64005.html?gclid=CKev5bb1rr4CFahaMgodd1oAUg
 
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