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Discussion Starter #1
I know they are the same type of water based, acrylic adhesive, but does anyone know if there is a significant difference? Is one better than the other, and if so, why?
I have a Woochie swamp hag prosthetic, that I will be wearing for 4-5 hours, outside, on Halloween. I also have relatively sensitive, but non-oily skin. I've read that Spirit Gum is sometimes hard on sensitive skin and also that it sometimes crystallizes and doesn't hold the prosthetic on.
So, I've come to seek the wisdom of the HF Gods.
 

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Ben Nye Prosthetic Adhesive is fairly similar to Pros-Aide. It can hold appliances on in hot environments, and if the performer is perspiring. Nye has formulated an adhesive remover called Bond-Off which is an oily remover similar to Detachol.

I suggest buying some and testing it. Yes, test! Glue your nose and chin on and see how well they last for four to five hours. Then you'll have some idea what to expect. If you don't want to get the oily remover on the rubber appliances (the mineral oil will attack the rubber), you can use a little alcohol to work the pieces loose, and then use the oily remover on a cotton ball or two to remove the adhesive from your skin. You'll want to gently soak the adhesive with the remover (to soften the adhesive first) and then gently rub with the damp cotton ball to remove. Have a supply of cotton balls handy for the removal process.

Spirit gum may also do a good job for you, and I would recommend getting a small bottle and testing that out, too, if you can.
 

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You probably know also about Rubber Mask Greasepaint, which is a type of makeup (used since the 1930's) containing castor oil instead of mineral oil. It is quite greasy and requires a liberal powdering to set. But because it contains no mineral oil, it will not attack the rubber prosthetic. You can tint the rubber mask greasepaint with a little bit of mineral/creme makeup color if you like--it will still work, more or less, so long as it contains only a small amount of mineral oil.

If you are unable to obtain rubber mask greasepaint, in a pinch you can make your own, by scraping some pancake makeup into a small container, crushing it into a powder, and adding a few drops of castor oil and mixing. Don't add too much oil, as you want your makeup to be thick, and heavily pigmented to the point of being nearly opaque.

After powdering, you can remove the dusty powder on the surface with a soft rubber sponge dampened with water.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks!! I have Spirit Gum as well as the Ben Nye adhesive, I just wondered d if there was enough difference between Ben Nye and Pros-Aide. In other words, I didn't want to spend the money on Pros-Aide if it's basically the same thing as the Ben Nye adhesive that I already have. I only have 1 prosthetic and didn't want to mess it up by test applying it with different adhesives...especially when I wasn't really sure how to clean it after I took it off.
I've ordered some new RMG paint to match the look I'm going for. If I pre paint it, a day or so ahead of time, can I leave the paint on, or should it be cleaned off and reapplied on Halloween?
 

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I would not prepaint with RMG...it leaves a greasy film that may make the appliance troublesome to handle (and hard to blend in, if you are using something like latex to blend the edges).

Painting your new face is the next step of your adventure, and doing a good job of it will make your creation look much more startling!

RMG is applied much differently from the way other makeups are applied. This is because the RMG is designed with a specific goal in mind--to help make a foreign rubber prosthetic appear to be a part of you, and not appear as something you have "added on.". The idea is that the rubber appliance is typically not anything close to your skin color and that you must apply a heavier coloration over both rubber and skin "to make them both look the same." That is why RMG is so opaque--so heavily pigmented. With a sponge, you apply an even, solid layer of the color to all exposed surfaces.

Something "magical" often happens at this point. All through the choosing and buying and applying of the prosthetic to your face, you have been aware that it is a separate rubber article. Now, with this even layer of color patted on with a white rubber sponge, the piece will appear to be almost "a part of your face."

To counteract the bland, flat effect of the one solid color, many artists will add some shadows and highlights to add more drama--shadows under the eyes and cheekbones, for example, and highlights on top of the cheekbones and brow. These can then be blended with the sponge so they do not seem so painted-on.

If you need a quick shadow color, try mixing a little bit of your base color with some black that you have melted out of a black eyebrow pencil. Mix the two together on a small plate or palette. This will give you a grayish color that will blend well with your base color, because it is simply a darkened version of your base color. A highlight color can be improvised in a similar way, by mixing some white with your base color. You can apply these highlights and shadows with various sizes of brushes. and then with a white rubber makeup sponge, you can blend them in with the paint job generally.

After you have shadowed and highlighted and blended everything on your face to your satisfaction, set with a powder puff and liberal amounts of powder. Do this carefully, pressing the powder onto the RMG, allowing the powder to absorb much of the oil out of the RMG; then pat and gently work the excess powder off your face. As mentioned before, a little water on a rubber sponge can then be used to gently wash some of the remaining dustiness off your face, and the brightness of your original paint job will be somewhat restored.

If you want to do a little test of your adhesives without messing up your appliances, go buy a couple of large balloons and try gluing a piece of one to your skin.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I just now saw your last comment Tomanderson, and what a great comment it was! Thank you very much for being so thorough, I needed that. By the way, I did test out the Ben Nye adhesive on some pieces of the actual mask. The eyes and mouth hole had been left partially attached, so I was able to cut them off the mask and glue them to my face like giant pimples. I wore them outside all afternoon while I worked on other props and they stayed completely in place. Removed with some 91% alcohol and then had a struggle to figure out how to get the remaining goo off my face. Eventually I found that rubbing a wet bar of Irish Spring directly on my face and then a washcloth and hot water would wash it off. I now have a bottle of 99% alcohol, but I haven't tried it yet, but I'm hoping it will not only detach the piece from my face, but also remove the glue.
 

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I use liquid latex (labeled for makeup applications) for adhering all my prosthetics. My very active actors wear them for about 6 hours. Removal is MUCH easier, and yes they stay in place. Even if you get a loose piece through the night a little latex on a brush or Q tip and your fixed. Liquid latex also gives us the ability to re-use the prosthetic for the next performance.
If you get the liquid latex into your hair or eyebrows, use a Q tip dipped in rubbing alcohol to rub under the prosthetic and it releases almost instantly, hair intact.
Soap and water takes any residue off the skin.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I haven't tested it yet, but doesn't the Ben Nye Bond Off remove the sticky from the mask so that it can be re-used? I probably misread something somewhere. I'm hoping to be able to clean the RMG paint and the latex off the outside of the mask and the adhesive off of the inside of the mask and put it away for next year. (Or the year after)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
View attachment 266440

After a full night of witchery, the Ben Nye adhesive was still holding strong. I did have a loose spot under my nose, (between my nose and my top lip), but, I figured that was a combination of first timer application error and generally speaking, that was the most moved and breathed on area. I was very pleased with the appliance itself and with the staying power of the adhesive. Even considering this was our first time using either item.
 
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