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Discussion Starter #1
I have decided to junk the one bike wheel for another pulley...I just think they stay on better on the pulleys. Also I didn't show the ghost but I was going to use the head you see in the video and make a trashbag body for her to kinda match my crankghost....any other ideas of what to make the body out of? Several other questions in the attached video. Thanks guys!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SenEv9DQLck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
update on this post: my conern about how the wheel was attached ened up to be very valid. it was hung up for a max of 2 seconds and it striped the spacer I was using to attach the wheel. I took the motor apart and welded the allthread bar onto the wiper motor and when I did I saw the the wheel inside the motor was plastic. ($15 motor from mosterguts) I was concerned that I would break that next, sure enough the next time it snaged the motor stoped spinning. I am keeping my eye out for a better motor to use for it and I am thinking of taking this one apart to see if I can use the drive arm that was spinning the gear. I figure what the hell I already broke the motor.
 

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BAD INFLUENCE
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I saw someone on here use a wiper motor going to a jack shaft setup that removed the majority of the stresses from the wiper motor. The biggest thing that I saw in your video was the bicycle wheel was not true and there was a lot of wobble, they really need to run as true as possible to eliminate any unwanted forces. I've also seen people use a sewing machine motor, if that helps. Good luck!!
 

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Gee, that bike wheel does look a bit wobbly. I'm not surprised if the line kept falling off.
One question: It looks like the motor is spinning faster than the wheel. Is the wheel still able to freely spin on its bearings, even though it's attached to the motor shaft? Maybe it's just the video makes it look that way. I would think the wheel should be securely mounted on the motor shaft and turn the same RPMs as the motor. Well, actually most haunters use a belt attached to a small pulley on the motor to turn the bike wheel.
As far as pulleys, I've even made my own pulleys. Cut a circular piece of wood and sandwich it between two thinner (but bigger diameter) circular pieces. Screw them together and drill a hole.
For my Axworthy, I also have used garage door pulleys. They aren't real big, but they have a bearing already installed in them. Cost about $5 at Lowe's.
For hanging your ghost, I think most haunters use fishing lure "leaders" to hang the ghosts from. That way the line can twist all it wants, but the ghost hangs straight.
Good luck with it! I haven't run mine in years, but I want to get it going again.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
well I swapped out the wiper motor for a sewing motor I picked up for $15 and it didn't have the torque to spin the wheel. The videos I see of sewing motors seem to be much larger than the one I picked up. I have a subpump motor on the way. I figure that will turn it and I can try again. My parents replaced a subpump and a garage door…so I am getting those two motors.
The wobble from the wheel was fixed after I welded the bar to the shaft. although I was only having problems with the line falling off on the free spinning end. I fixed that by ditching the bike wheel and going with another cloths line pulley.
I did see that most people use a belt but I thought that it would be easier to just attach it to the arm...thought being the key word there. I think the rpm of the wheel is just an illusion of the video.
Well next week I will try again with the new motor I am glad I started this project in May
Thanks for all the help
 

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I built one last year . I will tell you it is a very trying prop . We had ours working very well , but the nights of the haunt it was very windy and the windy would pull the line off . I used a 1800 rpm motor and geared it down . I used a second 21" wheel and a 2" pulley to reduce the speed . It was still a little fast but did work. We also learned the weight of the ghost has a lot to do with how well it works . Too heavy of a ghost and it will pull it down .We also had the line very tight . If you can get a sewing machine motor it is the best , because of the variable speed . I'm sorry I done have any picture to help you .It is a great prop , just takes time to get it to work .
 

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I dont like to use motors any smaller than 1/4hp for just 30ft runs.
The axworthy flying ghost efftect can be pulled off by using parts abroad but after building several of those things, even if you have the right stuff you can still have some issues.
I like using 1/16 aircraft cable so I can get good tension and the coating on the cable grips like no other and gets rid of slipping issues.
I also like to use metal close line pulleys they hold up better with the amount of tension needed.
 

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My attempt at an Axworthy Ghost is similar to yours. I started out going the sewing maching/bike rim route but quickly abandoned it for several reasons, one being the noise it made. I then wasted a whole bunch a time trying to slow down a ceiling fan motor. I finally got a wiper motor, some large metal plates, and some used bed frames and achieved my goal. Here are some pice and a short video. I used 200# black Dacron kite string which disappears in low light. I uses scrap bed frame steel to make the frame works. The pulleys are metal plates from the Dollar store glued together with JB Weld. I put bearings in all but the drive pulley, taking care to get them centered as close as possible. The drive pulley is attached to the wiper motor by using a threated coupler. You can see it in the first couple of pics. Due to the closeness of the drive pulley to the motor, side torque wasn't an issue. Getting the drive wheel centered on the wiper motor shaft was crucial to minimize wobble. The groove in my pulleys is pretty deep which helps the string stay on. That's the wiper motor under the black box/rain shield in the last pic. I pulled the string pretty tight and then attached tensioning springs to one of the pulleys to keep the string tensioned. I used sets of two fishing swivels at the third points in the string to both prevent twisting of the line and to make attaching the ghosts really easy. I used two stings for each ghost to help keep them flying straight. As for the ghost themselves, my best advice is to keep them light, light, light. I used Styrofoam balls with a thin wire for arms and cheesecloth. You could also use white or clear plastic trash bags.

There are lots of ways to do this but this worked for me. Although it is a little slower than I would really like, I'm very happy with it and was a huge hit with the over 1,500 TOT we got last year. Increasing the diameter of the drive wheel would also increase the speed.

Good luck and let us know how you're doing.












 

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Discussion Starter #10
that does look a lot like mine. The problem I had was those loops that I tied in the line to pull out slack ended up snagging on a bolt and binding up the prop. then the plastic wheel broke inside my wiper motor. I had foreseen this and was going to cut the loops when it was up for real but did not for the test....oops. the line
"after building several of these" really rang true to me. I get the feeling most people have a couple generations of this prop before it is working well
 
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