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Discussion Starter #1
How much does your Axworthy Ghost weigh? I am in the testing stage of my project and my current Ghost (Yet to Test) weighs 4lb 12oz. I would just like to get an idea of a weight range from successful displays.
 

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I'm in the testing phase as well and mine weighs 11.5 oz. My initial ghost weighed about the same as yours and in the tests I did I had to put the line under a lot of tension to keep it from sagging too much. That level of tension put the line close to its breaking strength and didn't leave enough of a margin for my peace of mind. The lighter ghost should work much better. I'll hopefully be able to do a test setup by the end of September.
 

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For most setups, I think 4 lbs would be too heavy. Without some serious extra engineering, that is. Axworthy's are pretty much designed to use a very lightweight ghost. I'd love to find a way to make a heavier flying ghost, because I have the perfect static prop, but it just hasn't worked out yet. Too much trial and error, not enough cooperation on the part of my minions. Well, one of these decades...
 

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My axworthy ghost is right about two pounds including the batteries for the led eyes and UV LEDs for glow. I however, have a problem I can't figure out. My motor keeps overheating, slows down the axworthy, then completely stops moving. I am using a sewing machine motor that spins a bike wheel. The bearings are good and the wheel spins easily, so why do I smoke my motor so easily? When it runs (about three minutes) it looks good... Any ideas guys/gals? http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fQ1re80fnjY
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone for your input just getting the final touches put on the drive unit before testing. I will post my results with pictures as time permits. Getting closer and closer to the bewitching hour - Kakugori clone those minions and send some to me:D
 

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My axworthy ghost is right about two pounds including the batteries for the led eyes and UV LEDs for glow. I however, have a problem I can't figure out. My motor keeps overheating, slows down the axworthy, then completely stops moving. I am using a sewing machine motor that spins a bike wheel. The bearings are good and the wheel spins easily, so why do I smoke my motor so easily? When it runs (about three minutes) it looks good... Any ideas guys/gals? http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fQ1re80fnjY
a sewing machine motor probably is not designed for continuous duty. People sew in spurts and the motor has time to cool down. If the load of your bike wheel with everything attached is more than it saw when it was in a sewing machine you may have issues. I had a problem with an axeworthy ghost motor overheating too. I had to attach a computer type fan to it pointing at it to cool it down and that helped but it still got really hot.
 

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Unless you have a real reliable gear motor, 1/4hp or more you will run into issues.
Here's why your smoking your motor.
The motor you have, sewing machine motor is not designed to handle the amount of work your forcing it to do.
Either your weight is too much or your run is too long from point a to b.
When we custom build stuff like that they're are no fans or bike wheels because you can not force a motor to handle a work load it wasn't intended for.
In regards to singer sewing machine motors and blender motors, they can suffice if you do the math.
You need to measure your output spindle ( the pulley that drives ) and run it against your control spindle to begin to figure out what your loss / gain is between the two.
The length of drag must be taken into consideration as well, for every inch of drop on a line ten feet long at 25lbs of tension on the drive line you have almost four pounds of drag on the motor.
 

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for an axworthy, the lighter the ghost the better, unless you really upscale your motor and wires.

the heavier weight will help to pull the line off the pulleys, so you would also need to add leading and trailing pulley wheels.

for the record I made my ghosts out of an upside down balloon (so I could fasten the line to something) and a piece of cheesecloth.

the only problem I encountered regarding the lightweight was if it got windy. my heavier earlier attempts caused me no end of problems
 

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I tried a sewing machine motor,burned up in a heartbeat,so i swithed to a Treadmill motor.I found a Treadmill on CL for 20 bux,took it apart down to the motor and controller.Hooked it all back up and man-o-man,lots of torque and any speed you want from a crawl to light-speed.Very reliable and wont burn out.
 

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Would a ceiling fan motor work here? Designed for continuous runs with a reasonable load. Variable speed and reversible if bneded..
Should have plenty of HP's
 

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Glowplug: A ceiling fan motor won't do a darn thing for you. VERY low torque, which yuo can easily see by putting you hand in front of the fan BEFORE you turn it on... you'll stop it dead in its tracks.
 

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I found a very good video the other day, and one of the biggest (and it's sounding like the best) pieces of advice abouting building an axworthy is... DON'T! LOL
Too much trouble. I had to laugh, but from a lot of the discussions in this forum, it's starting to ring true.
What I've picked up from all of this is:
1. Powerful motor, designed for continuous use
2. Minimize friction where ever possible
3. Extreme tension on the line
4. Light-weight ghost
5. Cross your fingers!
:) My two cents' worth.
 

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Good observation CC. I will look elsewhere. As for your other comment, what fun would not trying be? Where would we be without the Titanic or the Hinedenburg, or god for bid, Billy Beer, without trying something new? Seriously, thanks about the torque info, absolutely correct.
 

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Glowplug: A ceiling fan motor won't do a darn thing for you. VERY low torque, which you can easily see by putting you hand in front of the fan BEFORE you turn it on... you'll stop it dead in its tracks.
Beg to differ CC, but I tried a ceiling fan and it worked fine as far as torque was concerned. What caused me to finally give up was I couldn't slow it down enough to get the ghost speed I wanted, even on the lowest speed setting. I wanted to bolt the directly pulley directly to the fan and not mess around with gears. I tried a few different speed controls and couldn't get them to work.
 
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