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Discussion Starter #1
How important is the hp rating? I am looking at 2 similar compressors. One with 5 1/2 hp and the other with 2 1/2 hp. The out out are very close to the same withe the bigger motor having better specs. The bigger one is used and less money than the new with less output and only 40 more dollars. I am leaning toward the used as I want to run a sand blaster and will need all the high presure cfm's I can. Any thoughts ?I am having difficulty getting the specs to jive as the biggest difference in the two is the hp rating! Thanks
 

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Bigger is better! Especially if you are using it to run sand blasters or sanders or anything that requires an extended amount of constant pressure. More hp = fills up faster and will keep up during those longer sessions.

I have a 6.5 2 phase that I brought from the old house but the new garage doesn't have 220 so I'm dieing using my portable compressor.

If you haven't already, on the used one, open up the drain valve and check to see if there is any rusty water. #1 killer for compressor tanks is never draining them and letting them rot from the inside out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for tips and advice. I will check the tank.

I had the same problem years ago when I closed my little shop. 220 compressor and no where to plug it in. Sold it and not many days go by that I don't wish I had compressed air for something. Thanks
 

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Human Candy Shovel
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Such silly carp. Putting horsepower ratings on compressors are ridiculous. They should be rated in CFM and PSI as well, so you know how fast it can fill things and the maximum pressure to can store air at.

For example, my airbrush compressor is a 20 psi compressor (which means, for example, with the right adaptors, I could fill the average backyard grill 20 lb propane tank to capacity with air.

The compressor probably would rate at maybe 1/20 hp (it doesn't have a horsepower rating), but once that tank is filled, it would be able to power any pneumatic equipment needing a lot more horsepower. Not for long, but it would get the task done. So those horsepower ratings are, in a sense, a lie.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It is obvious that if you want more cfm's at higher psi's you need a bigger pump to provide them. A bigger pump requires more horse power to operate it at its optimum rpm for producing the needed cfm's and psi's not to mention the incredible volume needed to run larger tools etc other than a airbrush. I not sure what your point is except that you are happy with what you have. I doubt that a compressor with a 1/20 hp rating would spin a 1/4 die grinder more than a revolution or 2 and certainly would not have enough torque to do the job required of it. I imagine a more efficient motor and pump would negate all I have described here but better means more buckaroos Thanks ps I think I will go with the one with the higher hp rating, mostly because it produces more cfm's at higher psi's then the the other one. Nothing worse than having to wait on the compressor too build up enough head pressure to continue the job.
 

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Human Candy Shovel
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It is obvious that if you want more cfm's at higher psi's you need a bigger pump to provide them. A bigger pump requires more horse power to operate it at its optimum rpm for producing the needed cfm's and psi's not to mention the incredible volume needed to run larger tools etc other than a airbrush. I not sure what your point is except that you are happy with what you have. I doubt that a compressor with a 1/20 hp rating would spin a 1/4 die grinder more than a revolution or 2 and certainly would not have enough torque to do the job required of it. I imagine a more efficient motor and pump would negate all I have described here but better means more buckaroos Thanks ps I think I will go with the one with the higher hp rating, mostly because it produces more cfm's at higher psi's then the the other one. Nothing worse than having to wait on the compressor too build up enough head pressure to continue the job.
Wow, way to miss the point. That went so far over your head, I think you'll need a telescope to see it.

Incidentally, you are incorrect. More horsepower does not necessarily mean a compressor will automatically produce more PSI. It is possible for a lower horsepower compressor to produce higher PSI than a higher horsepower compressor depending on the bore of the plumbing involved in the manufacture of the compressor.

Anyway, my point is the tool industry is run by half-assed lazy tools that need to clean up their act and start labeling things suitably, and men need to stop pretending to be Tim Allen and stop accepting inappropriate horsepower labels as gospel.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think that maybe you should read with concentration my response. What I did say in order to achieve higher ratings then more hp's will typically be needed and I also said that all of that can change if you want to invest in more efficient systems. Not word for word of course but if you read the entire post and comprehend what I wrote then this should be clear. It's clear to me even after being ignorant most of my life. It was nice of you to respond but it didn't really add to the conversation or the original question. I'm done now good night
 
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