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Discussion Starter #1
Ive only seen two videos, but the effect is amazing, something with a fog machine, some form of pipe, and lighting, but some questions that spark in my mind are- what color lights,? how many? is the pipe perforated or do you have to?if so... is it holes or thin slices, do you need fans. It looks like such a cool effect but the video owners will not respond, this idea would be so awesome going on both sides of a path, like a walkway into hell..:D, i can see it now walking down a path fire rising up both sides, and seeing props operate right behind this flames. If you have any intel, plz let me know :D
 

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I'm thinking they have orange and red rope lights running along the bottom of the pipe with lots of holes for the fog and the lights to come out.
 

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Where wolf?
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Looks like at least 2 machines working alternately for the constant fogging. That or some massive expensive industrial fogger connected to a 50 gallon drum of juice.
 

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I don't think rope lights would nearly cut it. high power LEDs might do it, or some small theatrical lights, or something else that is both directional and bright...heck, a decent wattage colored bulb should do it.

I have a feeling there's only one color of lights, and the higher concentration of that color (caused by the concentration of fog) appears yellow, while the lower concentration appears red, particularly on camera.

...just thinking out loud
 

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Fog flames

If I'm not mistaken, I don't believe they are using a fog machine at all. They are either using a haze machine (VERY expensive) or some sort of steam generator (like a steam mop only bigger). Both would give you a more consistant and constant flow of "fog". As for the lights, I would imagine that some sort of directional lights are needed, such as spots. I don't think rope lights would give off enough illumination. Anyway, just my 2 cents.
 

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Oh! We were trying to figure this a couple of months ago in this thread: http://www.halloweenforum.com/halloween-props/88571-fog-faux-fire.html

I actually called the makers of a version and they responded in the thread I posted above. But, I'll also copy here what they said:
Hello, I did receive your emails and phone calls for information on the fire and how it is created. I am glad you guys like the effect.

We are pretty big haunt people, but tend to go a little different route from the home haunt... one year we built a haunted shooting gallery... last year was an 8ft highly detailed Ogre.

On the fire... I got good news and bad news... first the bad news, I am not going to give you the secrets of how it is done, sorry... we did a lot of R&D on the system.

The good news, I will point you guys in the right direction and confirm some of your suspicions.
1) yes, it uses a humidifier system. We also found using larger reservoirs(external tanks) allowed for a fairly good supply of steam that would last for an evening.

2) The lights are not LEDs, we used a few halogen. iirc, we only had 3 lights in that demo. Been a few years now.

3) We do use fans - sorry, about all I can say about that.

Anyway, about all I can say on the matter... I am glad you guys like the effect, good luck, and most important, HAVE FUN!

Cj


Here's the video of the system we were talking about:

 

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it's a really good effect, too bad he didn't want to share the secret.:rolleyes:

I still think this could easily be accomplished with a standard fog machine. This method should allow for larger flames than the silk flame version. Thanks for the info Terra. Maybe use a capped pvc tube with a long slit down the side of it to create a fog screen with LEDs placed every 2 inches or so along the pipe? a fan might not need to be used if there's enough propelled fore behind the fog.
I would think that a quick dissipating fog would be best.
 

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Where wolf?
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Ah yes I remember this discussion from before as Terra said. I had forgotten the steam approach. But really isn't a fogger basically that just? Has anyone hacked a fogger for constant running with the feeder line running to a larger external tank?

Hmmm...
 

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Ah yes I remember this discussion from before as Terra said. I had forgotten the steam approach. But really isn't a fogger basically that just? Has anyone hacked a fogger for constant running with the feeder line running to a larger external tank?

Hmmm...
I've seen that exact thing at theme park haunts (HHN, etc.). The feeder line is in a 5 gallon container next to the pro-fogger machine.

Also, I would use fast-dissipating fog juice for this application.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
But see the thing is, i dont want to use steam i want to use like a 1000w fogger, and no one i know has actually made a tutorial on this, my question is anyone willing to make a tutorial
 

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Ok here is what was used for the fake fire in the video. "Video test for fire effect using a hazer, foam pipe insulation, and strips of red LEDs. A bigger better model will be built and tested." I copied and pasted this from the video source.

Here is what wikipedia had to say about hazers,

Haze machines, or haze generators (commonly referred to as hazers), are effects machines similar to fog machines, designed to produce an unobtrusive, homogeneous clouds suspended in the air intended primarily to make light beams visible or create a subtle diffusion.
Unlike theatrical fog, which is typically intended to be dense and/or opaque, haze is generally very light and subtle. These properties allows a venue to be filled with haze prior to or during an event without creating an overtly distracting cloud. Haze typically has a substantially longer persistence ("hang time") than conventional theatrical fog. While conventional fog will hang in the air for several minutes, a haze effect filling the same volume of space can last upwards of an hour to several hours or more, depending on the size of the venue and the amount of ventilation.

The fluid used in haze machines to generate the effects are either oil or water-based. Most oil-based haze fluids use a mineral oil base, while water-based fluids use either a glycol or glycerol base. Although both formulations of fluid are referred to as haze fluid, the different formulations are neither compatible nor interchangeable. Glycol/water haze fluid is sometimes referred to as "water based haze" for the purposes of disambiguation.
 
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