Halloween Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Evenin' ~

This is a lengthy Show N' Tell of the Twisted Tales Haunted House I designed and built in 2019. The idea behind this thread is to document what my creative process was like, from concept creation to final production. Maybe it'll help some of you, maybe it'll just provide a good laugh!

Like any good haunted house project, it involved drama, betrayl, love, blood, sweat and tears. Buckle in and enjoy!

In the Spring of 2018, I was approached along with a small group of others by a couple of host organizations in town to build a family-friendly Haunt in the South Bay (Sunny SoCal). We didn't move forward on 2018, the rest of the design team dropped out, and I was left to carry on the project with the hosts on my own the following year.


Twisted Tales was the name I came up with, and the idea is exactly what it sounds like - fairy tales with a creepy twist! I'll be posting some of the design work used to pitch the idea to the City - it's neat to compare the conceptual renders with what was actually built, too.


The Haunt would consist of 8 scenes, each themed after a fairy tale. The first scene is a clautrophobia tunnel, the idea being that you "fall down the rabbit hole" into these stories. You walk under a rock arch before entering the pitch black rabbit hole, only to find yourself met with the squishy wall. Following the rabbit hole, you come up into the glittering mine where Snow White's Seven Dwarves have suffered a cave-in and are clawing out from under the rubble towards you, distracting from a zombified Ms. White jumping out from behind a false wall.


After escaping the mine, you open a door that leads to Beast's Castle, who has trapped Belle within. Meandering through the halls, you find 3 eerie portraits that catch your gaze. Out of nowhere, lights flash, noise erupts, and the portrait comes to life! Two of the three portraits are rigged with drop-panels. Rouding the corner, you find Belle in her cage, begging for help and issuing stern warnings - the Beast will get you! No sooner does she say this, the horrific monster comes roaring out from a dark corner, chasing you into the next scene.


Party decor and lights illuminate the path into a Mad Tea Party, where the Mad Hatter is playing a sick game of "Operation" on the March Hare! He invites you to join him, Alice and the White Rabbit to play doctor. The Hare's intestines are strung about everywhere, and it's your job to cut the right one! Cut the wrong one and suffer a startling surprise.


Wandering through into the next scene finds you in a dank, foggy swamp. Fiendish Billy Goats hide in the shadows, taunting passerby. A lanter-lit bridge beckons to be crossed. As you approach, you can hear the bridge groaning, roaring...it feels alive. You cross, but upset the Troll hiding in the opposite corner. The lights in the scene quickly dim, you hear his gutteral scream, and get chased out of the scene into the next nightmare.


A lifesize gingerbread house facade greets you in the next scene. The evil candy witch heckles and interacts with you, promising to turn you into her next treat! You enter her house only to find Hansel trapped on an oversized burner - he's being baked! He begs for help, pleading for you to help find his sister, Gretel, who managed to escape the Witch's clutches. The Witch appears in the house to quiet Hansel and turn up the heat - a stream of gingerbread-scented fog blasts up at you before she opens her giant oven door and forces you through. Now it's your turn to become a dessert!


The "oven" is a stretch of path that is heated under heat lamps. Gretel comes running out, charred and crispy, scaring guests through into a pitch black corridor.


You hear the faint sounds of something growling, breathing deeply. This is a monstrous creature....you trip a motion sensor, lights strobe brightly, and a massive dragon head comes charging towards you with a deafing roar. You run out to cover, and thus the fairytales have ended.


If it doesn't sound terribly scary, that's the point. I was asked to make this as family friendly as possible, and that's what I strove for. I thought the Mad Tea Party operation scene was pushing it, to be honest. But they loved it. By far the best part of the whole thing would be the dragon finale, as it was a professional prop purchased from S*areF*ctory. This ended up being a total disaster, as is the norm for them. Never again. But more on that some other time.

Here is the Haunt path layout:


Not a whole lot switchbacks here, which ended up being a bit of a detriment in the final product, but I was going for "scene immersion" rather than a traditional "maze" format. The biggest scenes were undoubtedly going to be the Troll Bridge and the Candy House, and the most impactful scares were going to come from the Bridge and the Dragon finale. I wanted a bit of interactivity as well, hence the Tea Party Operation opportunity and being able to cross a bridge that was "shaking."

Cast Placement

Lighting Placement

Audio Placement

Having these layouts really helped me flesh out the audio and lighting requirements for the maze. They were pretty rudimentary, but as forgetful as I am, it's nice to have something to reference back to. These layouts were created in early 2019, and would change dramatically over Spring and Summer that year.

For the record, I was doing all of the design work on my own time. Product/theme/Haunt research was all done on my own time because something in my gut told me there wouldn't be time or opportunity to wait. Plus, this stuff is exhilerating when in the planning stages! And my gut ended up being right..... Long story short, contracts took FOREVER to get finalized (don't think I signed until halfway through August), time was slipping by, and we went from being open for 20 nights to 9. It ended up being for the best, but I was losing sleep over the sheer undertaking that was before me in such a short amount of time. As a result, we had to scale back a bit. We cut one room entirely, moved the rabbit hole/claustro tunnel inside the building, went from hired talent to local youth vounteers, shortened some already limited switch-backs (but lengthened others), and tried like hell to make things just done enough to pass for a Haunt. It was a monumental effort on the City's part in terms of organizing volunteers and Recreation staff to work each night of the Haunt, and a colossal effort on mine to build this thing. I took a step back from my Full Time job to do this (and still ended up working both anyway some days, 30 miles apart from each other). Building wall panels was supposed to start on weekends in June, but didn't actually start until September. Thankfully, we had a pretty healthy budget and I had complete control over expenses, so that was less of a headache than I thought it would be. Trying to keep hundreds of receipts for every single purchase though is another story.

I'll continue the tale tomorrow ~
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
This was an ambitious endeavor, and well told! I love the theme, by the way!
Can't wait to read more!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
This was an ambitious endeavor, and well told! I love the theme, by the way!
Can't wait to read more!
Thank you so much :) More is coming!
Love the gingerbread house idea.
I was super excited for this area because it was being built on a small stage that was already in the building. I wanted to build out a "porch" from the facade of the house, but it ended up being a bit too ambitious.
holey cow batman, that's amazingly well thought out!

impressive

yes, we need more, please :)

amk
Thank you tremendously. I had 16 months to think about it all, so I'm glad it translates well.

----

Allow me to backtrack a little bit. Yes, contract signing happened late. Build didn't start until the second week of September! But that didn't stop me from working on other projects. Namely, the dragon head that would replace the S*areF*ctory catastrophe, and a photo op prop that would be used to help promote the haunt at events around the city.

Chuck the Dragon has been thoroughly documented in this thread, but here's a couple of pics showing the process:






The photo op arch was inspired by a couple of threads here on the Halloween Forum. In the original plans (1st post, 3rd picture), there was to be a rock arch that guests walked under. That unfortunately didn't come to be, but would be incorporated elsewhere. The host organizations wanted to be able to promote the Haunt at events in town, like the weekly Farmer's Market and various other seasonal gatherings. I thought a Photo Op would be great, as it would also serve well during the nights of operation. The plan was to build the arch out of PVC and chicken wire, spray foam over the form, wrap in shop towels/wood glue, and then paint.

Unfortunately I can't find the initial sketch I did, but I knew (mostly) what to get and set out to Home Depot for some supplies.


Supplies in hand, it was time to construct! Chuck supervised. I didn't really document this part of the process, but it was a total pain in the butt trying to make sure these pieces would separate cleanly for storage and transit. The chicken wire had to be positioned in just a way so that the expanded foam wouldn't prevent the PVC joints from connecting, but I also didn't want to have obvious gaps or separations visible once assembled. It turned out alright.


Then I began to spray foam. In my living room. Damn near ruining everything in it...live and learn. Not to mention the smell!




Don't worry, I only did one column's worth inside. The rest were sprayed out on the balcony. To help the foam adhere to the chicken wire without seeping through the holes constantly, I laid wet cheesecloth over the wire so give the foam something to stick to. And using the Allen Hopps recommended method, I sprayed the fresh foam with water to help it cure faster.


I really wasn't sure what "look" to go for in the beginning. Did I want a rocky aesthetic? Or more like tree trunks? I figured I would let the foam decide. I went in with the giant hot blade to refine some of the bottom portions and where the pieces joined together at the top, then began to wrap in shop towels/wood glue. By this point I was certain I had more of a tree trunk vibe going.


It needed some kind of signage at the top, so I decided to carve up some pumpkins with a spooky greeting. They had low voltage flicker LEDs installed in them that could run off of a 9v battery, so that way the arch wouldn't need to be plugged in at night.



By this point, I had stopped working on it because things stalled on the contracts again...plus I was running out of room in my own house for these things! But at last, I signed the paperwork and gained access to the venue. I managed to fit all 3 pieces (BARELY!) into my car and carted them off to be worked on further.



Close up detail of the staining done to the pumpkins, which were set into place with hot glue and floral wire before spray-foaming around to solidify them.



Finished painting, added some foliage and voila!


The trees were base coated in black flex seal (thinking that they had to be waterproof), but that was such a waste. We didn't see one drop of rain that Fall. Oh well. I then went over with regular black spray paint, and dry brushed several colors of brown and green Oops paint from HD. Once dry, I added in some spots of a bright green in deep crevices and shot them with water while still wet, allowing the color to drip and run down the sides - really just having some fun with color to bring out more texture. Moss was hot glued as well for added detail.

Some shots of friends with the arch who came out to see the Haunt (batteries died in the second pic)




You might notice painters tape on the floors of the venue - that was how I mapped out the final layout of the maze once I had full uninterupted access. More on that in another post.

Stay tuned!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
With the venue fully available to me in September (and no longer open to the public for the next 2 months), I was able to tape out the floors of the path I was pretty sure would fit. Some adjustments had to be made to the preliminary route that was laid out in the first post, but I also wanted to make sure EVERY section of path was at least 4' in width, with enough emergency exits to satisfy the fire marshall.

Where there is a lighter color space in each scene is just actor/scenic area. The areas in gray are emergency exits (5 in total), and the bridge had a "bypass" lane next to it for those unable or unwilling to cross.

These are the path drawings I made as I was mapping out the space with painter's tape, a 48" metal ruler and couple of 25' tape measures. The 48" ruler ensured I was maintaining proper path width at all times. For most of these drawings, 1 grid tile = 1 foot.

--

--

--

--

--


We were pretty much just waiting on the delivery of lumber at this point. I took a couple of days after sketching out the floor plan to build the exterior signage, which was written about in detail on this thread and pictured in the first post up top.

On September 13th (a Friday, no less) our lumber was delivered! 200 sheets of 1/4" 4x8 luan and 600 8' 2x4s were dropped off at our build site, which was about 200 yards from the venue. Maybe it was driver incompetence, maybe it was just Friday the 13th rearing its ugly head, but the luan was unloaded in a less-than-ideal fashion...


The driver was able to get it horizontal after some creative towing adjustments, thankfully. A second truck came by with the rest of the 2x4s as well. I built a small work table in the back to assemble panels on and also created a more level area to stack lumber onto. There was a SERIOUS slope in the designated workspace that made things challenging. The plastic-wrapped piece is the facade sign in-progress.


Over the following two weeks, I would build 150 flats (working with limited time table each day)...




One of the hosts arranged for a trailer to load up all of the flats onto and drive them over to the venue, at which point an awesome group of volunteers helped carry them all into the building. On October 1st, I started putting together the Haunt walls. Opening night was October 11th.

Holy Crap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I apologize that my timetable is a bit all over the place here!

As I've mentioned, contracts were signed in mid-August. I want to say around Aug 20th. I wouldn't have a check for allocated funds to spend until September, but I needed to start buying things like 3 weeks prior. I was authorized to spend on my personal cards and get reimbursed from the Haunt budget, so that's what I did. Almost every day, my doorstep at home looked like this:


Thankfully the dragon head and photo op arch were already stored elsewhere. We needed costumes, decorations, props, prop controllers, lighting, audio, fire extinguishers....we had to furnish an entire Haunt starting from scratch. This is why I spent so much of my free time on research and planning. I had every last item nailed down to a price and purchasing location on a spreadsheet as well as a VERY lengthy bookmarks folder.

Costumes were purchased from various places like eBay, Amazon, Walmart, secondhand stores, Zagone Studios, and Trick or Treat Studios. I had an amazing volunteer do all of the costume alterations for us and she had some awesome ideas of her own I was all too happy to incorporate. Some cast brought their own things, too, which was really cool.

Lights were purchased from Ned Kerr who I saw highly recommended on Facebook - I got 50 of his mini LEDs and used maybe 15 of them. Not because I didn't like them, I just built scenes that were way too big for them to be really effective, but they managed to highlight certain elements nicely. I also picked up 20 Colorpiano lights from FrightProps, and I fell in love! I wanted to buy more! They're super bright and the programmable nature of them is just too cool. With the exception of the fog machines (a Froggy's Titan 1200, an ADJ Upshot, and two Chauvet Hurricanes), all lights were 12v low voltage.

Audio came in the form of cheaper bookshelf speakers and budget multi-channel amplifiers. Music was licensed from both Kevin MacLeod and Chris Thomas. There were two types of Haunt - the main version and the kid-friendly version. The kid-friendly version had a 20-minute long soundtrack of some of Chris's more lighthearted spooky tunes that played over the exterior speakers and 6 interior speakers. The main version had 9 different soundtracks, including the exterior music and 2 independent prop-specific sound effects. I didn't want the cast to get bored or annoyed by the same 2 minute song playing over and over, so I tried to make the tracks longer than 6 minutes. I licensed 15 songs from Chris Thomas and filled in the rest with Kevin's music and did pretty well! Nobody complained, thankfully. Music was loaded onto inexpensive mp3 decoder chips that fed off of a thumbdrive, and they sent the music to 3 amplifiers that in turn powered 26 speakers across the entire haunt.

These show how I laid out the channel assigning from the mp3 decoders to the amps and then out to the speakers. The second picture was primarily to remind me what parts go where - I was buying the bulk of the interconnect from Monoprice, and the numbers scrawled everywhere correspond to product numbers from them.



And here's the final product, sans some wire connections. The smaller amplifier nearfield in the second photo is a subwoofer amp that drove the bass shaker units on the Bridge that gave it the appearance of groaning and shaking. More on that later on.



In this picture from the Troll Bridge scene, you have a larger speaker at left that played the kid-friendly soundtrack, a smaller speaker in the middle that played the main show's tracks for this scene specifically, and then the last speaker on the right is a self-powered speaker that played a triggered sound effect from a PicoBoo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
I am so intrigued by this tale. The amount of work and planning you put in is so impressive! I can‘t wait to hear the rest!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I am so intrigued by this tale. The amount of work and planning you put in is so impressive! I can‘t wait to hear the rest!
I am so pleased to hear that. Thank you!

Ok, now on to the good stuff I suppose.

Part of my contract stated that I was not allowed to post pictures of anything I was working on for the duration of the build, operation, and tear down. I wasn't exactly sure how much leniency would be given regarding this, and after having worked so hard and for so long to make this happen, I wasn't about to break the terms of the paperwork. This basically meant that I didn't take very many pictures throughout the process, and that REALLY bummed me out because I wanted to be able to do a photo blog/vlog. Additionally, I was so hellbent on getting everything done in 10 days that I hardly made time to document and take pictures.

But here's what I manage to grab - and for the record, the ceiling has always looked that destroyed. I wish I could say it added to the creepy ambiance, but you never really saw it in show lighting.

Built the last couple of hallways and scenes first.

Looking from the Candy House area towards the Oven/Dragon

Looking into the hallway from the opening pictured above (bottom left) - that was made for wheelchair access since the Candy House interior had a few stairs to go up (they were existing and we were unable to ramp over them).


I was trying to work in a way that wouldn't impede the flow of traffic from the main entrance to the offices in the back of the building where the adminstrative staff still worked every day. The next walls that went up were for the Mad Tea Party scene. The pool table would later be converted into an operating/tea table. The walls would be covered in fake grass with brightly colored tattered fabrics above.

Looking from Candy House area over the Mad Tea Party and towards the back of the building - the Castle was built where the brightly colored walls are. The space between the wall in the foreground and the wall just behind it was used for storage of equipment and furniture that was not able to be removed from the building.


After the Tea Party was walled, the Troll Bridge scene went up - green tape on the floor is where the bridge would be built.


Photo taken looking towards the finale scene. The path below led from the Troll Bridge to the Candy House. Black fabric on the walls is Duvetyne from Rose Brand. We covered every square inch of wall in the stuff. What a pain in the BUTT, but met the flame retardant requirements for the Fire Marshall. We scheduled a full day of 15 volunteers to cut, staple, wrap, and cut some more fabric to get the job done.


Candy House facade going up.



Beginnings of a human-sized birdcage I asked my dad to build - he came through big time for the last few days of this build. Gotta love him!

The cage was built to sit on an existing table that would more than support the weight of the actor inside. He shameless flailed around in it to prove it to me.


The rigging that the dragon head was suspended from. It could slide back and forth on this metal track, which was just part of a pocket door kit I got on Amazon. Worked great!


Beast's Castle starting to go up. This was one of the last rooms I did since so much was coming through this area day-to-day.

Rear wall of the drop portraits - actors stood between this wall and the one in the following picture (you can see the cutouts traced)


Holes cut out to fit the antique frames I found

Shot behind the drop panels - standard gate latch with added buttons for lighting/sound fx. Wired up to a Picoboo MP3 that played the SFX and triggered the Colorpianos to go from the ambient candle flicker to a flash strobe for a couple of seconds. Both panels were wired in parallel to the same Picoboo.


And while I don't have any in-progress shots of the Rabbit Hole squeeze tunnel, here it is assembled - bags were mounted on 1/2" solid plywood with heavily-braced 2/4 frames that were joined to each other, the walls in the room, and extra kickers to keep the bottoms of the walls from buckling outwards. Getting the pressure of the airbags just right was a mission - at first they were too tight, then they were too deflated. Ultimately we found the right combination but not without tons of trial and error.


Cool shot of the sign. I bought two sets of solar powered FireFly LEDs, but they were barely visible. Total bummer.


More to come!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Decor time!

Beginning to "sod" the walls in the Mad Tea Party. All the fake turf was liberally soaked in flame retardant, and passed the inspection just fine. Thank goodness - this stuff was expensive!


Lighting placement tests. You can see the plywood cover made to keep the pool table safe.

Decorated table with show lighting - the Colorpianos were programmed with a few different scenes to vary it up.




Getting the Castle dressed. Despite being coated in flame retardant, the stone covering didn't pass Fire Marshall inspection and had to be pulled :( The red fabric was IFR material from Rose Brand though.



Drop Portraits with some dressing and lighting




My dad once again knocking it out of the park with this Candy House facade. He built and finished the cage the same day as getting these panels dressed and painted. Total wizard.


Interior of Candy House - one of the last scenes to get any attention at all. Thank goodness it was foggy! An Upshot fogger hid under Hansel in the cage and the actor could trigger it at their leisure. It was "cookie" scented!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Camo for the Troll Bridge scene. Lots of camo. Two bulks rolls (8'x255') were purchased for the entire Haunt. One was used on the exterior of the building, the other used in this one scene alone! Super strong fishing line was strung from the 2x4 posts jutting up from the walls. It kept the camo up while being strung from the posts, and we made the walls higher in this scene because the bridge had about a 3' rise in the middle, which would give the guests an unwanted view into other scenes without the added wall height.

Stacks of boxes of fans seen here - every actor spot throughout the Haunt had their own fan. It got HOT up in there! The mirror ball was removed and used in the Mad Tea Party - seemed more appropriate ;)


The bridge was built by a handful of professional carpenters and contractors from one of the host organizations. And boy did they build a bridge - this thing belonged in a park!




Some show lighting

Got to throw in some of the Witchy Swamp Lanterns I made!



I wish I had documented it, but the Bridge scene had a triggered scare. As patrons walked across the bridge, a motion sensor activated a BooBox - using a 9ch decoder, I was able to get the ambient lights in the scene (all the green) to dim to almost-off while a sound effect played of a large creature roaring. Small single LEDs from Ned Kerr and a Colorpiano were mounted to the side of the bridge pointed towards the rear corner of the room and would strobe as sound effect played, revealing the Troll and scaring guests across the bridge and out of the scene. Then the ambient lights would come back up to full brightness. Depending on the actor and the night, sometimes the whole thing timed right, sometimes it didn't. People had fun, and that's all that was important :)

Here's a walkthrough my dad took on one of the nights.

And here's some pics of stuff being taken down





It's crazy to think what was accomplished in such a short amount of time, and it would not have happened without the help of my friends, family, and the host organizations staying on top of things at the City level. There are a lot of things we'd do differently next time around, but for the 2019 season it turned out pretty neat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
The final product turned out great!

But there were still several questions left unanswered... haha.

1. what happened to the original dragon?
2. how did the witch’s house lose the front porch?
3. Why did the tunnel have to come inside?
4. I’d like to know about the timeline. Why were things pushed back so much? Was it drama? Was the shortened timeline the reason for most of the changes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I’m happy to answer any questions!
The final product turned out great!

But there were still several questions left unanswered... haha.

1. what happened to the original dragon?
2. how did the witch’s house lose the front porch?
3. Why did the tunnel have to come inside?
4. I’d like to know about the timeline. Why were things pushed back so much? Was it drama? Was the shortened timeline the reason for most of the changes?
1. David from ScamFactory never delivered and kept our $$$. We pursued legal action for about 12 months and then cut our losses. This guy needs to be run aground. I believe most - or at least some - of his employees are good people. But he has a tight leash on them. I spoke directly to one in hopes of rectifying the situation but it went nowhere. Sad.

2. Porch was cut mostly for time. It was going to have to support actor weight and movement and the bridge took priority. Not having an actor on the porch gave them more freedom of movement in the scene though. Silver lining!

3. Budget and time again. I wanted to cut one room and the Mine was the easiest to axe. Moving the tunnel inside also kept it safer from the elements and potential vandals.

4. Without a doubt the things that took the longest were the contracts with the City. I was brought on as an independent contractor to provide “Professional Services.” The contract was almost 15 pages long. The City had an insurance vendor they suggested I reach out to for coverage, and that vendor dragged their feet for almost 6 weeks. Then I find out they aren’t able to insure the thing...so very frustrating. I did some digging and found Frazier insurance - they had a quote to me within 1 day and it was $3k less expensive than Donat. I had that locked in at the beginning of July - and it still took another 6 weeks to have the contracts finalized.
Getting involved with the City was a blessing and a curse. They provided the venue and storage, but we had to play by their rules (and deal with their shortcomings).
I won’t even go into the total cluster that was the marketing of the whole thing....

Not sure if this event will return again to be totally honest. If it does, it will look radically different, potentially in a different place altogether. And I may or may not be involved. But that’s a whole ‘nother year away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
That looked like so much fun! What an undertaking! No idea that so much went into a real haunted attraction. Congrats!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
I’m happy to answer any questions!

1. David from ScamFactory never delivered and kept our $$$. We pursued legal action for about 12 months and then cut our losses. This guy needs to be run aground. I believe most - or at least some - of his employees are good people. But he has a tight leash on them. I spoke directly to one in hopes of rectifying the situation but it went nowhere. Sad.

2. Porch was cut mostly for time. It was going to have to support actor weight and movement and the bridge took priority. Not having an actor on the porch gave them more freedom of movement in the scene though. Silver lining!

3. Budget and time again. I wanted to cut one room and the Mine was the easiest to axe. Moving the tunnel inside also kept it safer from the elements and potential vandals.

4. Without a doubt the things that took the longest were the contracts with the City. I was brought on as an independent contractor to provide “Professional Services.” The contract was almost 15 pages long. The City had an insurance vendor they suggested I reach out to for coverage, and that vendor dragged their feet for almost 6 weeks. Then I find out they aren’t able to insure the thing...so very frustrating. I did some digging and found Frazier insurance - they had a quote to me within 1 day and it was $3k less expensive than Donat. I had that locked in at the beginning of July - and it still took another 6 weeks to have the contracts finalized.
Getting involved with the City was a blessing and a curse. They provided the venue and storage, but we had to play by their rules (and deal with their shortcomings).
I won’t even go into the total cluster that was the marketing of the whole thing....

Not sure if this event will return again to be totally honest. If it does, it will look radically different, potentially in a different place altogether. And I may or may not be involved. But that’s a whole ‘nother year away.
Thanks! You worked so hard and this deserved to go well. It seemed people really had fun. Stinks that some stuff had to get cut, but that is the haunting way... haha, we always dream bigger than the time we have.

there’s always next year! I hope you are able to continue in some capacity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
701 Posts
Wow impressive to get that much done in such a short time! I can imagine the stress of taking on a project of this magnitude! especially when a big chunk of money is basically stolen ( no prop in return) Great job!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top