Halloween Forum banner

1201 - 1220 of 1281 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,796 Posts
I was away for a couple days, and came back to see evidence of (spotty) frost damage. A lot of my pumpkin plants are now done. I harvested most of the fruits, but they're a muddy mess. It's 50° F and raining; I'll get them cleaned up and photographed when it gets a little nicer.
Chubstuff-- Well Big Max... or maybe just 'Max' is quite a cutie! The squash look great; I'd certainly decorate with them!
Also, what are the red flowers behind your patch? They look too tall for Bellis, and kind of rounded for Zinnias... They're pretty!
I can commiserate about the weeds. We had our wettest year on record this year, and it just doesn't pay to go out and compact the soil by stomping around on the mud. My pumpkin plants didn't get big enough to make a solid, weed-discouraging canopy, so I "got to" keep weeding them by hand. My bottle gourds are a mess though, and I know there will be a billion fresh new weed seeds in there for next year.

Ladyfrog-- Not more than a few days over 75? Wow, I thought it was on the cool side here, but we had a lot of days in the high 70s and low 80s. Your pretty little almost-orange pumpkin is a trouper to ripen in those conditions!

Kdestra -- Dental work-ugh! I hope you're feeling better now!
Sweet that you're on a garden tour for a good cause! I agreed to put our house on a Christmas tour for a fundraiser for DDs school several years ago. Oh my gosh the stress! Several of us were Constant Remodelers-- always several DIY projects going, and we were all having nightmares rushing to finish things before the tour! Gardens are terribly unpredictable. At least when you finish and interior project, it tends to stay done. The gardens change every day. That's part of what's delightful about them, but it would be stressful to prep! I'm sure things will look gorgeous, though, and that visitors will get a good learning experience.

UnOrthodOx -- You got some very nice pumpkins, especially for just leaving the to their own devices! Those big ones could be amazing carved! If you carve them, I hope you'll share pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Our overnight temps have been in the 30s and 40s for almost a week and the plants are not looking good plus there has been no change in size or color for a couple weeks so I bit the bullet and harvested all 6 of my pumpkins. They were all orange on the bottom so hopefully leaving them in the sun (if the sun returns, lol) will result in them turning orange. That's what I did last year with one and it worked. These are the biggest pumpkins I've ever grown! I'll try to weigh them later mostly to satisfy my own curiosity as they are nothing compared to what you all produce 😁 I placed a gardening glove in the pictures for reference.
 

Attachments

·
Kitchen/Green Witch
Joined
·
6,600 Posts
Our overnight temps have been in the 30s and 40s for almost a week and the plants are not looking good plus there has been no change in size or color for a couple weeks so I bit the bullet and harvested all 6 of my pumpkins. They were all orange on the bottom so hopefully leaving them in the sun (if the sun returns, lol) will result in them turning orange. That's what I did last year with one and it worked. These are the biggest pumpkins I've ever grown! I'll try to weigh them later mostly to satisfy my own curiosity as they are nothing compared to what you all produce 😁 I placed a gardening glove in the pictures for reference.
Nice pumpkins! I hope you can get them to turn orange! If not, I hope they last awhile, anyway, being green!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,796 Posts
Chubstuff -- Odd the way a person's mind works...well odd the way mine works, anyway. I woke up about 4 AM with my mental voice (and I just mean "strong thought" because my mind isn't functioning that oddly) saying "Asters! They're asters." Honestly, it took a couple seconds before I even understood what I meant. Apparently my subconscious was still processing what my conscious mind had long let go of-- whether it was correct or not! :LOL:

Ladyfrog-- Your pumpkins look beautiful! As long as they've started to change color even a little, you have a very good chance of their getting orange before Halloween.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
891 Posts
Chubstuff-- Well Big Max... or maybe just 'Max' is quite a cutie! The squash look great; I'd certainly decorate with them!
Also, what are the red flowers behind your patch? They look too tall for Bellis, and kind of rounded for Zinnias... They're pretty!
I can commiserate about the weeds.
The large red flowers were part of a seed exchange find last year. They were labeled California Giant Zinnia. The first year, the only colors I got were pink and that reddish color you see. They bloom in all manner of shapes from a rounded button type that looks almost like a dahlia to a flatter version that looks sort of like a daisy on steroids. I'm not sure if there will be seeds to save this year. There's not been a truly dry time for over a month and the flowers are more molding than seeding, but I am going to try to harvest what I can. They really make nice looking, easily cared for flowers.

As for weeds, they cover the ground and give back to the soil when they get dug back in come spring. The only ones I don't care for are the Scotch thistle as they're prickly and get in the way of my regular gardening. That said, I have a hard time killing them all off at a certain point because I watch how many bees fly to them for food when they bloom. I'm a pretty sucky gardener. There are a handful of weeds that come up every year that I let grow because either I or my partner think they look pretty.

And when it comes down to it, that's sort of what the definition of a weed is, I think. They're the plants you don't like the look of out-competing the ones you want. For me dandelions are really very pretty and provide early spring food for the bees before any other plant. So, they get a complete pass in our lawn. A late blooming pink flowering pea of some sort that's very prolific around our area gets a pass as well. So do violets because they were my mom's favorite small flower. We have a little blue flowering weed that I like so much I transplanted it to a safe place when I was digging up new beds. There's a yellow spike flower that I really like, and we have a version of what gets called bachelor buttons that we look forward to seeing every year in our great big patch of weeds out front. (We call it a wildflower bed, but the neighbors call it something different I'm sure.) :)

All in all, weeds in our garden have a much easier life than they would many other places. We still have plenty of tomatoes and veggies on a good year despite our lackadaisical attitude toward the weeds. But I will admit this year with the low temps, cloudy days, and rain coming all at once for weeks, the weeds survived because they're adapted to rough conditions. Our tie-dye tomatoes didn't fare as well. In fact none of our veggies did. Oh well, we have some lovely weeds still blooming, so the garden is not a complete loss. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
891 Posts
Chubstuff -- Odd the way a person's mind works...well odd the way mine works, anyway. I woke up about 4 AM with my mental voice (and I just mean "strong thought" because my mind isn't functioning that oddly) saying "Asters! They're asters." Honestly, it took a couple seconds before I even understood what I meant. Apparently my subconscious was still processing what my conscious mind had long let go of-- whether it was correct or not! :LOL:
I have often referred to my thinking patterns as weird, bizarre, and a few more derogatory adjectives that will go unspoken. It seems indelicate of me to point out now how similar your thought patterns and mine sync up now that I've mentioned that. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,796 Posts
I have often referred to my thinking patterns as weird, bizarre, and a few more derogatory adjectives that will go unspoken. It seems indelicate of me to point out now how similar your thought patterns and mine sync up now that I've mentioned that. :rolleyes:
Hahaha! I've just learned not to think of words like "odd" and "bizarre" as being derogatory. They describe the extraordinary. ;)

And thanks for the plant information!
Weeds like clover and dandelion get a full pass in my lawn (the latter sometimes earns its keep when I make wine) but I'm less tolerant in the garden. We have terrible weed pressure, and if I don't stay on top it, weeds are the only thing I'll have. I do plant lots of options for bees and butterflies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
I'm right there with you both - Chubstuff & Ooojen! Besides I'm not wasting $$$ on killing weeds. Have you ever smelled a dandelion? I love their scent.

Ladyfrog, cant believe it's in the 30s for you already. I'd freeze to death there.

The dentist bruised my cheek with his finger. I knew here was pressing my jaw but damn! Now I have a long green bruise. I go out of my way to tell people it was the dentist that did it because I don't want anyone to think it was my sweet hubby. He'd never ever hurt me. Hopefully it's gone before the garden tour on sunday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
I'm right there with you both - Chubstuff & Ooojen! Besides I'm not wasting $$$ on killing weeds. Have you ever smelled a dandelion? I love their scent.

Ladyfrog, cant believe it's in the 30s for you already. I'd freeze to death there.

The dentist bruised my cheek with his finger. I knew here was pressing my jaw but damn! Now I have a long green bruise. I go out of my way to tell people it was the dentist that did it because I don't want anyone to think it was my sweet hubby. He'd never ever hurt me. Hopefully it's gone before the garden tour on sunday.
My husband and I have a long standing disagreement regarding clover - he thinks it's a weed but I like it. I think it's pretty so I leave it. He's too lazy to do yard work so I win 😆

I don't think I would go back to that dentist 😬 Ouch!!

Of course, now that I harvested everything our nighttime temps are back in the mid to upper 40s which is a little more normal. Oh well I was getting too impatient anyway 😆
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,632 Posts
Early this morning hubby and I started working on our Pumpkin light. I'm really happy with my corn this year even if the squirrels damaged half of it. I'll get better photos tonight
Love that right there. We need a night shot now.


I actively attempted to talk my wife into a lawn alternative, including clover, when we were doing the landscaping. I might actually be slowly winning the battle as she's at least considering a fully xeriscaped front yard now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Love that right there. We need a night shot now.


I actively attempted to talk my wife into a lawn alternative, including clover, when we were doing the landscaping. I might actually be slowly winning the battle as she's at least considering a fully xeriscaped front yard now.
Our front yard is very hilly and slopes toward street. All the water runs off & it's impossible to mow. So we turned it all into a Mediterranean garden (lavender, rosemary, etc)
Xeriscaping is great but brown all winter so consider adding woody herbs, native Witch Hazels and red dogwoods.

Hubby loves the front yard for his tombstones because of the hillside.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,796 Posts
Ooo, with all due respect to the necessary work they do-- visiting the dentist is bad enough when they're at their best! Get a rough one, and it's hellish!
I hope the garden tour went well, Kdestra! I would so love to be able to leave my lavender and rosemary out all year! They have be potted up and brought into the sunroom.
Ladyfrog-- That's funny that lazy wins it for you! heehee!

We're finally having a couple nice days, but the weather is supposed to take a serious turn for the worse later in the week. It was time to start harvesting, cleaning, and getting ready to display. It's kind of a big project. All the rain left every pumpkin clogged or coated with dirt, and our sidewalk project means my usual display area is cluttered up-- But I'll start with my photos. This was the year of the herbicide drift, of course. Yields were low on the plants that were hit, but I got at least one pumpkin each from the plants that survived. (The couple varieties that weren't badly affected did beautifully.) Also, the plants themselves were set back. They produced as much as the smaller vines could support, I guess.
I didn't have anything handy to use for perspective, but these are mostly mid-sized pumpkins.
Galeux d' Eysines/Peanut -- so productive other years; I got one pumpkin this year, and consider myself lucky to get that, as it was from a pretty late flower. I have to say, it's a beauty, though. The background color is unusually deep.
20191007_115003[1].jpg

Jamboree produced two pumpkins. I've grown Jarrahdale (previous years), Blue Doll, and this one, and this is my favorite blue. Unlike J, it matured and colored up reasonably early.
20191007_114757[1].jpg

Moranga -- I just love this one, and will definitely plant it again. I only got two pumpkins fully mature, but there's a third I left on the vine. (It actually has a whole bunch of little ones coming, but there isn't time for them.) It's not fully colored up (it's gold, with just a hint of salmon coming on) but I think will last through Halloween once it's harvested. My morangas have very short stems, and the fruit grew upside-down. The bottoms have the best color, so I'll probably display them the way they grew.
20191007_114732[1].jpg 20191007_114714[1].jpg

Mr Fugly -- I don't find them fugly. The combinations of colors are interesting from up close, but I don't really feel like they brought anything dramatically different to the table. They're fair-sized, and should be carveable-- just ok, I guess. There were two plants, three pumpkins on one, and one on the other. SVB hit them pretty hard...like almost ALL the maxima varieties.
20191007_122409[1].jpg

Last for now-- Blue Doll-- a little larger variety. The leaves are bigger and taller than most of my pumpkins'...though I will say the vines were pretty contained.
20191007_123824[1].jpg

Rouge vif d'Etampes (large Cinderella type) -- one solitary pumpkin. It brought several more up to 6 or 7" diameter, but they blasted. So it goes. This is another short-stemmed one that grew upside-down (I guess I should have guided it sideways) and it's a much "vif-er" rouge on the bottom.
20191007_114652[1].jpg

More to come!
 

·
Kitchen/Green Witch
Joined
·
6,600 Posts
Ooo, with all due respect to the necessary work they do-- visiting the dentist is bad enough when they're at their best! Get a rough one, and it's hellish!
I hope the garden tour went well, Kdestra! I would so love to be able to leave my lavender and rosemary out all year! They have be potted up and brought into the sunroom.
Ladyfrog-- That's funny that lazy wins it for you! heehee!

We're finally having a couple nice days, but the weather is supposed to take a serious turn for the worse later in the week. It was time to start harvesting, cleaning, and getting ready to display. It's kind of a big project. All the rain left every pumpkin clogged or coated with dirt, and our sidewalk project means my usual display area is cluttered up-- But I'll start with my photos. This was the year of the herbicide drift, of course. Yields were low on the plants that were hit, but I got at least one pumpkin each from the plants that survived. (The couple varieties that weren't badly affected did beautifully.) Also, the plants themselves were set back. They produced as much as the smaller vines could support, I guess.
I didn't have anything handy to use for perspective, but these are mostly mid-sized pumpkins.
Galeux d' Eysines/Peanut -- so productive other years; I got one pumpkin this year, and consider myself lucky to get that, as it was from a pretty late flower. I have to say, it's a beauty, though. The background color is unusually deep.
View attachment 722767

Jamboree produced two pumpkins. I've grown Jarrahdale (previous years), Blue Doll, and this one, and this is my favorite blue. Unlike J, it matured and colored up reasonably early.
View attachment 722768

Moranga -- I just love this one, and will definitely plant it again. I only got two pumpkins fully mature, but there's a third I left on the vine. (It actually has a whole bunch of little ones coming, but there isn't time for them.) It's not fully colored up (it's gold, with just a hint of salmon coming on) but I think will last through Halloween once it's harvested. My morangas have very short stems, and the fruit grew upside-down. The bottoms have the best color, so I'll probably display them the way they grew.
View attachment 722769 View attachment 722773

Mr Fugly -- I don't find them fugly. The combinations of colors are interesting from up close, but I don't really feel like they brought anything dramatically different to the table. They're fair-sized, and should be carveable-- just ok, I guess. There were two plants, three pumpkins on one, and one on the other. SVB hit them pretty hard...like almost ALL the maxima varieties.
View attachment 722775

Last for now-- Blue Doll-- a little larger variety. The leaves are bigger and taller than most of my pumpkins'...though I will say the vines were pretty contained.
View attachment 722776

Rouge vif d'Etampes (large Cinderella type) -- one solitary pumpkin. It brought several more up to 6 or 7" diameter, but they blasted. So it goes. This is another short-stemmed one that grew upside-down (I guess I should have guided it sideways) and it's a much "vif-er" rouge on the bottom.
View attachment 722778

More to come!
Beautiful pumpkins!! Love!

(Side note: I am, also, going through dental work misery...to the max...which just got even worse, today. I feel for ya', Kdestra.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,796 Posts
I didn't get too much farther with pumpkin cleaning. I harvested a few gourds, and worked on other things.
But here are some NOID volunteers, the black and orange teardrop-shaped ones. The plant came up right on the edge of the garden, fairly close to the Goosebumps hybrid, so it's just as well the vines didn't get very big. It still produced 9 fruits, though.
Second picture gives a little size perspective with a gallon milk jug tucked in among the pumpkins.
Ignore the big pumpkin on the left. It will get its turn later.
20191007_182303[1].jpg 20191007_191307[1].jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Yeah, dental work can be painful but I actually like the guy.

Ooojen, the garden tour was great but I'm never going to do it again.... it's just to stressful. Everyone was pleasant but there's always gotta be 1 jerk.

Was moranga difficult to grow or put out miles of vines? It's so pretty do you mind if I try growing it next year?

WK best of luck on your upcoming appointment
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,796 Posts
Kdestra-- I'll be happy to tuck a couple moranga seeds in with the gourds'. I promise I'll get to it long before spring, though I won't make any grand statements about "before Halloween".
It's hard to judge how Moranga'd do without "intervention" because everthing got set back so severely. But what I saw-- Moranga was right next to (8' or more away, but nearest of the C. maximas) Blue Doll. The latter had long petioles and large leaves, but Moranga was much smaller and more contained. That said, the M. plant really started growing in Sept, once its first couple fruits matured, and it has lots of tiny (but doomed) pumpkins set now. I would say that it might vine a lot, but that it should put out a lot of fruit to go with the expansion of the vines. (As opposed to the gorgeous Musquee de Provence that can have loads of vines with hardly any pumpkins.) So if you wanted less of it, I believe you could keep it pruned and still get a good quantity of pumpkins.
I would be really pleased if you do decide to try it, and I'd be anxious to see how it does for you. I'm absolutely NOT possessive about the varieties I grow, and I love the sharing/learning we pass around on this forum! :)
 
1201 - 1220 of 1281 Posts
Top