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  1. #1

    Default Foam castle walls

    Did anyone see Celebrity Apprentice last week where the guys team was doing a 3D walk through for a Harry Potter Wizards area? They were building the set back panels in a studio and I liked how they did the castle walls. They used blue foam board for the back panel part and then cut out stones which they shaped, glued and adhered to the flat panel. These seemed to be maybe 1 to 1-1/2 inches thick with a flat side for adhering. I thought it came out really well. I've seen people here create rock walls a number of different ways but don't recall this approach. Curious if anyone uses this method.

    Loved the dragon entrance that the women's team had.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Wyoming
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    305

    Default

    I didn't see it, so I went searching for pictures. Found one HERE. That does look pretty good.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Hockeytown
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    468

    Default

    That'sa pretty good photo, and good styling. I would be careful to keep the stones tight together, cuz this photo looks like they have HUGE gaps of "mortar" between the stones.

    I would suggest that you take a sheet of foam, and chalk-line or yard-stick the sheet randomly all over across it, to make very random, non-similar geometry. Then cut all the lines, and you will have a lot of very rugged and asymmetrical stones.

    Take each stone and rough them up a whole bunch. Attack them with a file or rasp, and really gouge them up. No sharp square corners allowed! Even gouge up the centers to recess them and really get them natural and random. I'd also start spraying them with el-cheapo spray paint (Lowe's has 97-cent cans of flat black, a case is less than 12 bucks) to get the stony texture.

    Then, shuffle and mix them up, and start gluing them to the plywood framing. You'll most likely need to cut stones to make things fit right and get a tight, appropriate look. To fill between the stones, use Great Stuff or el-cheapo caulk. Remember, the "mortar" should be thin so they're recessed back from the faces of the stones. But use enough so its very uneven and not smooth or flat. Hide the plywood between, but do it sloppy to get it looking good.

    Then start slathering on the paint!

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fravak View Post
    I didn't see it, so I went searching for pictures. Found one HERE. That does look pretty good.


    Thanks for the NBC link to illustrate. Another good photo showing the castle walls is Photo 15 of 34. The display consultant asked the guys what they were doing for overhead and as you can see they came up with foam wooden beams and a chandelier. I liked that they added some beams in the doorways also. While the spacing of stones was set kind of far apart with lots of mortar in between, I actually don't think the result was that undesirable.

    A good photo of the dragon entrance is Photo 17 of 34. I'm pretty sure during the show they briefly showed the head being carved out of the foam, layers of foam cut, glued and shaped to form the 3D result.

    During the show they showed the contestants painting the foam and gluing it. I really enjoyed this episode because of the prop building aspect. I thought the women's wand shop was cleverly done (Photo 24 of 34). The boxes would go flying off the wall thanks to someone poking them off the shelf from behind with a stick through a small hole in the wall. And when the kids found the right wand for themselves there was a bright light that came on and a fan that blew wind through their hair. Very nicely done.

    I've loved reading and watching the Harry Potter series and in the first hour of the show the team leaders went to Universal Studios in Orlando and got to see the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, one of their new displays opening this Spring. Kids are going to love this. Just like being on the movie set.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Dryden, Michigan
    Posts
    1,081

    Default foam walls

    Here are some pics of my walls in the building process.

    This is the start. I cut stone pieces out of foam and adhered them to the walls with 100% silicone adhesive, I have found this to work the best.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Always scarying the YELL out of them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Hockeytown
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkmaster View Post
    Here are some pics of my walls in the building process.

    This is the start. I cut stone pieces out of foan and adhered them to the walls with 100% silicone adhesive, I have this to work the best.


    Well done so far. Large and foreboding.

    I would want to add pointers for you on coloring. Try to make the mortar lines stand apart from the stones. Either have the mortar lighter than the stones, or darker. Add some moss coloring to the tops of some of the stones. And you can add some erosion by making drip lines where rain water has leaked and trickled down the walls over the "centuries". If you have a joint over another stone, make a trickle down that stone from the joint line, as if the water followed that mortar joint down with gravity.

    Smooth over the edges and corners a bit more, so they look like they were hammered and chiseled into shape, not sawn or cut. Even a few cracks or broken-off edges will add age and character. Remember, don't make it look too perfect or new, you want an ancient feel with this.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Chicago suburbs
    Posts
    348

    Default

    Not the round stone type, but my project from '09 may give you ideas about texturing and painting. Be careful, some paints contain solvents that will melt the foam and could ruin your project. Test on a small scrap piece first. I used flat black latex over my entire facade. Then, I tinted the black toa grey by adding white paint and dry brushed the "stone wall". This highlights the texture.



    You can take a look at my gallery pic's for more pictures of the finished facade.

    Hope this helps.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Hockeytown
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    WOOOOW! Now we're talking! That's some serious prop building! The stone work looks really good. Drybrushing is so effective, man. A technique everyone should learn and master.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Chicago suburbs
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    Default

    Thanks Bryan. The great thing about the dry brushing technique is that it's VERY easy and gives a great effect with minimal work/paint.

    Trust me, it took me longer to build a shelf for the 22" computer monitor that I used for the mirror face than it did to cut and paint the facade. I used fishing line to gather the "curtains" and then just thumb tacked them to a wood strip that was mounted to the foam. Even the frame was foam (painted black, dry brushed with gold).

    I used a Tippi foam cutting tool for the "brick" and a small butane torch for texturing. Use well ventilated area when cutting/sculpting foam with hot irons (toxic fumes).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Glendale, AZ
    Posts
    1,619

    Default

    Man that is off the hook. I'm thinking this would be good for a drop panel as well.

 

 
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